Lost Diggers of Weston

On Friday 1 March 2019, two members of the Cultural Collections team attended a very interesting presentation on Alexander Galloway’s Lost Diggers of Weston at the Kurri Kurri Library.

The presentation was given by representatives from Towns with Heart and the Edgeworth David Museum, including Lexie Matthews and Cheryle Shoesmith (Edgeworth David Museum) and Graham Smith, Bill Holland and Sharon Dyson-Smith (Towns with Heart).  The presenters covered the story of Alexander Galloway, coalfields photographer, as well as the stories of the Great War diggers whose photos he captured prior to their embarkation.

This presentation was the prelude to the Lost Diggers Exhibition to be held on the 2019 ANZAC weekend in the Saint Paul the Apostle Anglican Church Hall, Lang Street, Kurri Kurri. The exhibition will feature photos of all 60 Lost Diggers, together with the stories of those who have been identified. These photos were produced from scans of the original glass plate negatives.

Full details of the forthcoming exhibition will be posted as soon as they are available.

 

On Fortune’s Cap

History Seminar Series

School of Humanities and Social Science
The University of Newcastle

Held in the Cultural Collections (near the Information Common)
Level 2, Auchmuty Library, Callaghan Campus

Friday 2 November 2012, 10:00am, followed by morning tea

Malcolm St Hill (PhD Candidate, University of Newcastle)

‘On Fortune’s Cap: The Legacy of the Almost Forgotten Australian, Frederic Manning’

Ernest Hemingway read Australian Frederic Manning’s The Middle Parts of Fortune each year to ‘remember how things really were’ in the Great War. He labelled it the ‘finest and noblest book of war’ that he’d ever read.

What is it that caused Hemingway and other giants of Twentieth Century literature to label this novel (and its sanitised twin, Her Privates We) as one of the best books about war ever written?

Manning, who served in the ranks of the British Army, is barely recognised in his own country. With the re-publication of The Middle Parts of Fortune by Text Classics will Manning surface within the Australian literary and national consciousness?

Malcolm St Hill will read from Manning’s novel and discuss its legacy.

All welcome!

The Middle Parts of Fortune Her Privates We

Exhibiting Refugees: The 1915 War Aid Exhibition in Vienna

History Seminar Series

School of Humanities and Social Science

The University of Newcastle

2012, Semester 2

Held in the Cultural Collections (near the Information Common)

Level 2, Auchmuty Library, Callaghan Campus

Friday 19th October, 10:00am, followed by morning tea

Julie Thorpe (University of Western Sydney)

‘Exhibiting Refugees: The 1915 War Aid Exhibition in Vienna’

The 1915 War Aid Exhibition in Vienna put the Habsburg Empire’s wartime refugees on display in an exhibition that was as much about the Empire’s own legitimacy as it was about aid to displaced victims of war. The paper situates the 1915 exhibition within a broader relationship between empire, ethnography and museums at the turn of the century, addressing the ways in which the monarchy, museums and national elites all sought to foster the empire’s supranational identity of ‘unity-in-diversity’ and superimpose that identity on local populations in both metropolitan and local public spaces. Governing practices at both the imperial and local level relied on this visual representation of the empire’s constituent populations to legitimize relations between and across the empire’s nationalities and the monarchy itself. Museums and ethnographic work thus acted in their own as well as other (often mutually compatible) interests by creating an embodied landscape of governed diversity in the empire. The paper concludes on a contemporary lens ¾ digital, coloured, archived, mobile ¾ to speculate how the story of wartime refugees might be woven into other stories about trauma, materiality, humanitarianism, internationalism, memory and commemorative practices across boundaries of time and space.