Seeing the Shadow

 

 

PETER TILLEY WEB INVITE

Peter Tilley, Seeing the Shadow II 2017, painted cast iron on polished stainless steel, 43 x 78 x 15 cm.

Peter Tilley

Seeing the Shadow
21 MARCH – 14 APRIL 2018

The elusive, insubstantial nature of the shadow lends itself to metaphor, myth and legend, with its significance contemplated by human consciousness throughout history. Shadows appear as essences of the soul – the externalisation of the inner self – as guides or advisors. In Jungian psychology, shadows contain parts of ourselves that are suppressed, denied, or unfavourable.

For his PhD research, Peter Tilley examines the theory and philosophy of shadow,
developing and utilising an array of materials, found objects, symbols and methods that
enable the construction of shadows to visually or symbolically disclose fundamental traits and mnemonics of the ‘casting’ figure.

The resulting sculptures become complex representations that explore illusions of certainty, memory and imagination – the mysteries of the unknown – and the fundamental identity and attributes of the figure/self.

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTIST FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING AT
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY
SATURDAY 24 MARCH AT 3PM

Peter Tilley is represented by May Space, Sydney

PETER TILLEY WEB INVITE

Re-stitching Culture

RE-STITCHING CULTURE Doll-making in indigenous cultures

IMAGE: RE-STITCHING CULTURE DOLLS 2017 LEFT – RIGHT Aunty Audree Trindall, Audrey, Aunty Pearl Slater, Mum (Eileen), Arlettha, Johnny, Aunty Shirl Weatherall, My younger self (Shirley), Lyniece Keogh, Will & Tom. Fabric, yarn, threads and filling. Image courtesy Tess Reading

RE-STITCHING CULTURE

Doll-making in Indigenous Cultures

21 FEBRUARY – 18 MARCH 2018

Doll-making is an intrinsic part of many Indigenous cultures across the world, including communities in Australia, Canada and South Africa. In all three cultures, doll-making represents a transfer of cultural knowledge, the building of capacity, and the reclaiming of Indigenous identity, on both a local and a collective level.

The benefits of these outcomes are important to supporting health and wellbeing in Indigenous communities. RE-STITCHING CULTURE showcases examples of doll-making from three Indigenous groups that continue to strengthen their local communities. Specifically, the Gomeroi Yarning dolls (Australia) which encourage the sharing of oral personal narratives; the Six Nations Cornhusk dolls (Canada) to promote the transmission of cultural teachings; and the Siyazama Zulu dolls (South Africa) used to create community support networks through locally relevant HIV/AIDS awareness.

PLEASE JOIN VICE-CHANCELLOR PROFESSOR CAROLINE MCMILLEN FOR THE LAUNCH
THURSDAY 22 FEBRUARY FROM 5:30PM
UNIVERSITY GALLERY

RE-STITCHING CULTURE is supported by the NSW Government through Create NSW, and is a joint project between the Tamworth Regional Gallery, the Gomeroi Gaaynggal Arts Health Program, and The University Gallery, University of Newcastle.

Pagination

Pagination. The Book as Object and The Australian Book Design Aw

 

Pagination. The Book as Object

& The Australian Book Design Awards

EXHIBITIONS

3O MARCH – 30 APRIL 2016

THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY

Please join us at the University Gallery for the opening FRIDAY 1 APRIL at 5:30 PM, launched by University Librarian, Gregory Anderson.

 

Plexus

Sandra Burgess, PhD Exhibition Plexus. 28 Aug-14 Sep 2013, University Gallery

 

SANDRA BURGESS Plexus

PhD Exhibition 28 August – 14 September 2013

The University Gallery

Plexus means interweaving or plaiting, and the research for this PhD exhibition explores ways in which history, nature and society mesh to distinguish specific locations. The history of place and memories, the journeys to and from it, the connections to the environment, and to its people all shape our experience of place.

The site for this research is Hanging Rock, near Nundle NSW. Sandra Burgess considered the discarded waste from the mining past, the fragments of domestic life, the weeds that invaded the country – along with the colonists and the small life forms which are important to the environment but often disregarded.

Microscopic organisms, such as diatoms, are of particular interest as the forms are varied and delicate, inviting imaginative interpretation. Single celled microalgae found in abundance in healthy aquatic environments, diatoms make up a large part of the bio-mass of the planet and are an important part of the web of life that we all share.

Using media such as ceramics, paper and found objects, a new environment is created as a Wunderkammer of the extraordinary and ancient environment of Hanging Rock.

Please join the artist for the opening

Saturday 31 August from 2 pm at the University Gallery,