Algernon Wants You!

Algernon Wants You Poster.

Algernon Wants You Poster.


PLEASE NOTE:

The DOI for the transcribed Eversleigh dataset is :http://dx.doi.org/10.25817/5b46a2a483841.

Belfield, Algernon (2018) Meteorological observations for Eversleigh Station, near Armidale, New South Wales, Australia 1877-1922 (transcribed). The University of Newcastle. Collection.dx.doi.org/10.25817/5b46a2a483841.



ALGERNON WANTS YOU!

VOLUNTEERS WANTED!
DATA ENTRY OF HISTORICAL WEATHER INFORMATION

We (a research group from the University of Newcastle & the University of New England)   have obtained a very important set of weather journals for the property Eversleigh for the years 1877 to 1922.  Our research has established that this  information is the best and most complete set of weather measurements for the time period on the New England Plateau.

This information is all handwritten in tables and is 98% complete.  To allow analysis, the information must be transferred
into digital spreadsheets. Scanning and recognition software do not work.  The information transfer can only occur by

PEOPLE POWER!

DO YOU LIKE WORKING WITH NUMBERS?
DO YOU LOVE ACCURACY & ATTENTION TO DETAIL?
DO YOU HAVE MICROSOFT EXCEL INSTALLED ON YOUR COMPUTER?
ARE YOU INTERESTED IN HELPING?

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?

THE ANALYSIS OF THE INFORMATION IS IMPORTANT FOR THREE REASONS:

1. IT PROVIDES A “PRE-HUMAN IMPACT” ASSESSMENT OF WEATHER AND CLIMATE  THAT CAN BE USED AS A BASE TO ASSESS LATER HUMAN IMAPCTS ON GLOBAL WARMING

2. IT PROVIDES IMPORTANT WEATHER INFORMATION TO HELP UNDERSTAND THE  HISTORY OF RURAL ACTIVITIES IN THE NEW ENGLAND AREA

3. WHEN COMBINED WITH OTHER SIMILAR INFORMATION  IT CAN ADD TO THE  OVERALL UNDERSTANDING OF THE HISTORICAL WEATHER AND CLIMATE  INFORMATION FOR AUSTRALIA

ENLIST TODAY!

CALL YOUR LOCAL ARCHIVIST

Bill Oates (University Archivist, University of New England)
Ph. (02) 6773 6565
Email: woates@une.edu.au
or
Howard Bridgman (Conjoint Associate Professor, University of Newcastle)
Mob: 0425 281 387
Email: howard.bridgman@newcastle.edu.au

 

 

BACKGROUND

Please find below links and interactions we have had regarding the meteorological records of pastoralist, meteorologist and astronomer Algernon Henry Belfield (1838-1922). We have created three blog posts regarding these climate records:

18 February 2011 Mapping Our Climate – to announce the digital deposit of the records with the University of Newcastle:
https://uoncc.wordpress.com/2011/02/18/mapping-our-climate/

9 March 2011 Climate archive to help predict extreme weather events – Scanned Registers belonging to New England pastoralist Algernon Henry Belfield containing his observations made at Eversleigh Station from 1877-1922:
https://uoncc.wordpress.com/2011/03/09/climate-archive-to-help-predict-extreme-weather-events/

19 January 2012 – Belfield Climate Archive Expands with New Find – Announcing new find of additional volume (1908-1922) and included in above scans, to provide us with a 45 year data set of solid scientific climate records. In addition is a video of the Algernon Henry Belfield Inaugural Lecture at UNE:
https://uoncc.wordpress.com/2012/01/19/belfield-climate-archive-expands-with-new-find/

Belfield Climate Archive Expands with New Find

Algernon Henry Belfield (1838-1922)

 


PLEASE NOTE:

The DOI for the transcribed Eversleigh dataset is :http://dx.doi.org/10.25817/5b46a2a483841.

Belfield, Algernon (2018) Meteorological observations for Eversleigh Station, near Armidale, New South Wales, Australia 1877-1922 (transcribed). The University of Newcastle. Collection.dx.doi.org/10.25817/5b46a2a483841.


Late last year a old register containing a further treasure trove of scientific climate data was unearthed.

The register, belonging to leading New England pastoralist, meteorologist and astronomer Algernon Henry Belfield (1838-1922), brings to a conclusion the climate records meticulously collected at his observatory and weather recording facilities at Eversleigh Station over a period of 45 years.

The work is a testament to Algernon Belfield’s dedication to the collection of scientific climate data, and his love for the elements, the final record was taken on the 2 July 1922, only weeks before he died on the Saturday 5th August 1922.

Richard, his grandson, relates that on the Wednesday prior to his death, he had collected his mail, which was a buggy trip to Dumaresq Railway Station with his fox terrier, coming home he complained to one of his boys that he was feeling a little weary and retired to his room at Eversleigh. He passed away early Saturday morning, buried on the Sunday, therefore not disrupting the working week. An efficient man to the end.

Eversleigh Homestead

The Register was digitised by William Oates at the University of New England, and uploaded into a single PDF file by the University of Newcastle’s Cultural Collections. You can download the entire Register as a single PDF here:

Register of Meteorological Observations taken at Eversleigh 1908-1922 (63 MB PDF File)

Register of Meteorological Observations taken at Everleigh 1908-1922 (280.2MB PDF File) 2015 Scan

To access the full climate archive click the following post relating to the original deposit of climate data records from 1877-1907:
https://uoncc.wordpress.com/2011/03/09/climate-archive-to-help-predict-extreme-weather-events/

Gionni Di Gravio
University Archivist

Algernon Henry Belfield Inaugural Lecture

“A Gentleman researcher in 19th century New England”

28th February 2012

On the 28th February 2012 the University of New England (UNE) Alumni presented a public lecture on meteorologist, astronomer and pastoralist Algernon Henry Belfield entitled “A Gentleman researcher in 19th century New England”.

Professor Howard Bridgman (centre) holds one of Algernon Belfield’s Climate records with Mr William Oates (left) and Richard Belfield (right)

The public lecture featured presentations from Mr Bill Oates, UNE University Archivist, Mr Richard Belfield, grandson of Algernon, and donor of the Belfield Climate Archives, and Professor Howard Bridgman, from the School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle.

The lecture was held in the Main Seminar Room Drummond and Smith College.

Richard Belfield pictured viewing his grandfather Algernon Belfield’s climate records