The Derkenne Courtyard

Warren Derkenne (Image Courtesy of Mrs Beverley Derkenne)

On the 14th August 2012 the newly re-designed and refurbished Derkenne Courtyard was re-opened to the University community.

The Derkenne Courtyard was originally named in 1990 in honour of Warren Derkenne (1933-1999), the former President of the University Union (1964-1966) and Warden of Convocation.

Warren Gerard Derkenne LLB (Syd), BA (Hons) (New) was educated at Newcastle Boys’ High School and majored in English at the University of Newcastle, from which he graduated with honours, second class first division, in 1968.

While he studied, he was President of the University’s Union and was involved in the planning of the Shortland Building, within which this very courtyard stands.

After graduating, Mr Derkenne remained active and involved with his alma mater, and made a significant contribution through his role as an alumnus. He became a convocation member of University Council in 1966 and on the 7 May 1971 was elected Warden of Convocation, succeeding Joe Talty. He was Warden until May 1974.

Through the Council and University committees, Mr Derkenne lent his expertise across the University on a number of important issues ranging from advocating for the establishment of a law school to overseeing the fundraising by Convocation to purchase the doors to our Great Hall. He retired from Council in 1983, and was awarded an honorary Master of Arts by the University in 1990.

Mrs Beverley Derkenne and family (Photograph by Gionni Di Gravio)

The Derkenne Courtyard was officially unveiled and re-opened by the University of Newcastle’s Vice Chancellor Professor Caroline McMillen and Mrs Beverley Derkenne.

Given his contribution and passion for the University, it is apt that one of the most recognised and vital spaces on the Callaghan campus for the University community is named the Derkenne courtyard. It has long been a favourite spot for staff and students to relax, catch up with friends, listen to live music, or according to history, stage a few protests!

[We acknowledge the research assistance of Scott Brewer of the UoN50 Project and Kate Robinson in the Office of the Vice-Chancellor in the preparation of this post]

Festival of Autonomy 2012

Festival of Autonomy Thursday 2 to Friday 10 2012

Autonomy Day 1967 – Colour Slide by Ross Smith

The Festival of Autonomy 2012, has taken on a sixties theme this year.

The University of Newcastle was constituted as an autonomous institution on the 1st January 1965 by a Proclamation of His Excellency the Governor of New South Wales and signed and sealed on the 23rd December 1964 under the provisions of the University of Newcastle Act of that year.

Have a look at this site for further information:
https://uoncc.wordpress.com/2007/07/26/universitys-grant-of-arms-and-autonomy-day/

The first day of January, 1965 signified when the illustrious University of Newcastle was declared Autonomous from its forebearer, the University of New South Wales.

Autonomy day is normally held in early July, and students interpreted it as celebrating the autonomy of the University of Newcastle, from the University of New South Wales.

The date actually coincided with the winning of autonomy by the University of Technology from the Public Service Board control on the 1st July 1954. The students were entitled to give the celebration whatever meaning they chose. The fact that they called it ‘autonomy day’ heightened the students’ sense of the importance of autonomy and their need to defend it against outside interference. (Wright, 1992):113

Who needs an excuse to party?

Please have a look at a series of beautiful images captured by Ross Smith and Katherine Macneill back on the 19th July 1967 and available here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/sets/72157601130140961/with/7736237636/

Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Newcastle View of City and Harbour - Autonomy Day 1967Newcastle View Overlooking Harbour - Autonomy Day 1967Newcastle View Overlooking Harbour - Autonomy Day 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Autonomy Day 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Procession through Newcastle on Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Autonomy Day 1967Civic Park in Newcastle on Autonomy Day 1967Autonomy Day, 1967Autonomy Day procession down Hunter Street Newcastle 1967 (Enhanced)Students at the University of Newcastle (Australia) 1967Students at the University of Newcastle (Australia) 1967Students at the University of Newcastle (Australia) 1967Students at the University of Newcastle (Australia) 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University of Newcastle International Students Union Dance June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University of Newcastle International Students Union Dance June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University of Newcastle International Students Union Dance June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University of Newcastle International Students Union Dance June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University of Newcastle International Students Union Dance June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University of Newcastle International Students Union Dance June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University students function circa June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University students function circa June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University students function circa June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University students function circa June 1967Newcastle band The Cult performing at University students function circa June 1967

Autonomy Day Quiet – Newcastle Morning Herald 20th July 1967

Back in September 2005 former editor of Opus Mr Paul Danks came in to the Archives to speak about an early expedition to the Callaghan Campus back in 1962. Paul took the series of photographs for an Opus story called Mud, Mush and Mosquitoes. Download the story here: Opus Visits the Shortland Site – 29th August 1962 or from the images below.

Opus Visits the Shortland Site – 29th August 1962 (Front Cover)

Mud Mush and Mosquitoes – Opus Visits the Shortland Site – 29th August 1962

Back Page archive online

Back Page

Back Page, August 1994

Back Page archive is now online

Back Page, the former newsletter of the University of Newcastle Sports Union, has been digitised by the indefatigable Tom Robinson and uploaded to our website. Enjoy revisiting the sporting triumphs of your time at the University.

1994

1995

1998

1999

2000

2001

UoN50 – University Surfriders Club Film (1968) Surfaces

Mr Robert Sirasch has recently brought our attention to a film treasure. If anyone knows where we could get further Super 8 video digitised please let us know. He writes:

In 1968, our uni surfriders club, after a contest at catho, went to the overflow of one of the local power plants.

This is the super 8 film  of the time we had.  Gary Flynn one of our better surfers, now a retired Army Major (a counsellor) kindly provided the film from his archives. If you look carefully a teen age Cheryl Kernot is somewhere amongst it all. Being then politically motivated I was the foundation Vice-President, after instilling others with the idea of forming the club. Bryn Newton-John was our mentor encouraging us to be separate from the swimming club.

Garry has the Super 8 film of that and a few IV’s (which we won for 15 years in a row under the Presidency of Chris Tola. Has the uni any facilities for digitising and enhancing old super8 film? Are there any form of grants available to have that done – we would go dollar for dollar I am sure. As you can see by the activities many of us still think “we had the time of our lives”

I’ve started to annotate the clip with names those there will recognise. They include Dr Terry Wall OA, and Dr Jim Stanger the IVF guru both UoN people of note.

Regards,
Robert

Film by courtesy of Garry Flynn (AMF Major retired.)

University History

Revisit the University of the past!

The University’s Campus Bulletin and its successors from 1988 to 1995 have now been digitised and are online. Former staff and alumni of the University of Newcastle will be able to revisit their days on the campus by browsing through these wonderful snippets of University history. The three versions of the newsletter, The University of Newcastle Campus Bulletin, The Bulletin and the somewhat unusually named Van Gogh’s Ear, were scanned, OCRd (optical character recognition) and had metadata in the form of title and author added to the PDF file by our indefatigable and highly efficient volunteer, Tom Robinson.

These are available on our website, but are also listed here for your convenience. Enjoy dipping into the past of the University of Newcastle!

The University of Newcastle Campus Bulletin

1988

The University of Newcastle Bulletin

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993 – Bulletin & Van Gogh’s Ear

1994

1995

Towards UoN50

Newcastle University Establishment Group inspects proposed site for the University, early 1960s.

The University of Newcastle has a rich history. In 2011 we will launch a major project for staff, students and the community that captures our unique past. Towards UoN50 will chronicle and celebrate the milestones, as well as the little known facts, that have made the University what it is today.

The Website is here: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/about/UoN50.html

As we approach our 50th anniversary in 2015 we want to work with students, staff, alumni, volunteer and support groups, and the community who have all had a hand in shaping the institution.

We want to hear your stories.

Towards UoN50 will be celebrated in many ways. There will be permanent and temporary displays across campuses of historical objects and photographs that showcase the University. All current schools and divisions will be involved and can nominate key people, achievements and objects that they consider are an important part of their history.

A working party, chaired by Emeritus Professor Adrian Page, has been established to guide the project. In addition to the on-campus displays, the Working Party will commission a writer to document the past 50 years. The Herald will also regularly feature highlights from Towards UoN50.

Soon you will see Towards UoN50 taking shape with displays in our libraries, and in the School of Education and the School of Environmental and Life Sciences.

Take a look at some of the early photographs on Flickr photo sharing application where over 10,000 images related to the University have been uploaded by Peter Longworth, who volunteers with the Cultural Collections. The Conferring of Degree (Graduation) Booklets (1959-2009) , the University Gazette (1966 to 1988) and University News (1970 to 1974) have been digitised and are also available online.

This is an exciting and important project for the University and the community. We need your ideas and feedback to make it a success so please contact the team at UoN50@newcastle.edu.au

Huldah Turner’s Writings

Publications and Other Writings by Huldah M Turner

Huldah Turner

Huldah Turner

  • An analytical survey through character of Graham Greene’s ‘The power and the glory’ / Huldah M. Turner
    Kotara, N.S.W. : Newtex Productions, [196-]
    Cultural Coll/RB STAFF 823.912 GREE-2 TURN
  • The background to the history of costume / by Huldah M. Turner. Book 1. The ancient world
    [Charlestown, N.S.W.] : [H.M. Turner], [1973]
    Cultural Coll/RB STAFF Q391.009 TURN
  • Edouard Dujardin, James Joyce, and the “interior monologue”, from an M.A. thesis submitted to Sydney University in 1943-4 [manuscript] / by Huldah M. Turner 1944
    Cultural Coll/RB STAFF Q823.9/J89/12

NB: A copy of the entire thesis has been kindly donated to the University Library by the Turner family and is held in Archives.

  • Mootwingie : snake cave / Huldah Turner
    [New Lambton. N.S.W. : Nimrod, 1994]
    Cultural Coll/RB STAFF PamA821.3 TURN-1 MOOT 1994
  • “Landscape near Madura, Western Australia” In Lines from a lakeside city : poems selected for the 1994 Roland Robinson Literary Award / edited by Betty Roe
    Boolaroo, N.S.W.] : Lake Macquarie City Council, 1994
    Cultural Coll/RB   A821.3 ROE 1994
  • “Joe Fanatomy” In“Speaking of Union Street…” Reminiscences of Newcastle Teachers’ College 1949-1973 3.12 Mb PDF file.
    Archives Shelf Location A7460 (v)
  • ‘Address’ from Huldah Turner to Dr Douglas Huxley. 4th March 1992  Reminiscences of Newcastle Teachers’ College. Click here for the Original Recording [2.20 MB mp3 file]
    Archives Shelf Location A7460 (v)
  • Huldah Turner’s Poetry

    Huldah Turner

    Huldah Turner

    Selections of Poetry by Huldah M Turner

    Huldah Turner was a talented poet, winning the third prize in the Roland Robinson Literary Award for Poetry in 1994.  Some samples of her work are reproduced here with the permission of her family.

    Mootwingie

    Mootwingie - Snake Cave

    Mootwingie – Snake Cave

    I

    THE WAY

    You will find the place.

    Leave the level plain
    with furrowed shallow dunes,
    sand-smoothed wind-blown gibbers
    and speckling clumps of salt-bush
    baked to brittle hardness
    by the desert suns

    Walk into a long and narrow valley
    carved out man million years ago
    from steeply tilted beds
    of the Bynguano Range.

    Dry crevices and crumbling edges
    feed hungry roots
    of prickly wattles,
    wilga trees
    and stunted cypress pines.

    Through this lowly scrub
    a curving line of river-gums
    will mark the way —
    creamy trunks,
    twisted, gnarled,
    deeply slashed with dyes
    of purple, grey and indigo,
    rise imperially
    from roots thrust down
    to moister sand below.

    Follow the dry creek-bed
    till the loose red sand
    washes the feet
    of wind-scalloped rocks;
    climb past the seven terraced pools,
    sandstone-paved,
    gouged by cataracts from sudden rains,
    now mystery-still,
    mirroring weathered tessellations
    and slabs of hard blue sky.

    Above the seventh pool
    a level time-crazed ledge spreads out,
    fretted, pitted,
    worn to dull mosaic
    by water, wind and rain.

    II

    THE CAVE

    Your feet now tread that ancient ground
    where once the Wilyakali men
    held secret, solemn rites.
    Walls of jagged rock
    stand sentinel
    around the sacred crouching Cave,
    arched majestically,
    enormously
    across the sky.

    Over the concave fire-abraded wall
    the dreamtime Rainbow serpent coils;
    dusky-red
    it weaves a way
    through upturned ochre-stencilled hands.
    Etched and carved
    from base to arch,
    on a painted web of lore and ritual,
    warriors hold high
    long spears in battle victory,
    hunters triumphantly
    bringing home the kill —
    kangaroo and euro,
    reptile, bird and dingo.

    III

    THE VISION

    If you listen to the quiet
    you may chance to hear
    an eerie bird call —
    message to the living from the dead —
    slicing sheer through time and silence.

    Rest then beside the Mushroom Rock,
    close your mind against the day,
    surrender will until the Snake spell
    takes you back into the Dreaming;
    till your pace throbs to the measure
    of the pulse of other days;
    till the ashes of Wilyakali
    rise before you
    from the mists of Dreamtime.

    You will see
    angularly dark against the night
    naked dancers leaping all together
    in ritual corroboree;
    awesome complex shadows
    flung in quivering patterns
    intricately moving
    over watching walls;
    the coiling Snake
    flickering life-like in the light
    of flame-coloured smoke.

    You will hear
    Bargundji words
    uttering tribal incantations,
    initiating tribal laws,
    teaching tribal myths and legends
    to the young men and children;
    you will hear
    voices raised in singing exultation,
    dark feet beating
    in the steady rhythm
    of warrior dance.

    You will smell
    the smoke of campfire —
    sharp scent of eucalypt
    from crackling leaves and twigs —
    and pungent burning flesh
    of hunting spoil.

    You will feel
    abysses at the edge of being,
    time like water flowing,
    distance rolled out endlessly;
    you will know
    the bonds of sacred tribal rites
    through the tapping out in unison
    of dancing rhythms
    with the clacking beating sticks;
    you will touch,
    hands carefully exploring,
    mystic carvings,
    tribal totems,
    cut into the cave-face —
    incised texts of ripened wisdom,
    books in stone,
    lore for all Wilyakali generations.

    Here they learned the yearly promise
    in the seasons and the stars,
    in the spring sap of the eucalypt,
    in the flight of a bird
    winging to water,
    in the ripple of sand-dunes
    lipped by the wandering winds,
    in creek-beds gently flowing
    then soon drying after rain,
    in sullen rivers snaking
    sluggish over sand-bars
    to sink into an inland salt-sand sea.

    IV

    THE RETURN

    The vision passes —
    day and sun return.

    You will go back
    the way you came,
    past the pools
    and river-gums,
    past salt-bush,
    gibber
    and the dunes,
    numbed by a dimension
    not known to those you know.

    You will make your way
    weighted by sadness
    and scape-goat shame;
    on pilgrim shoulders you will carry
    the crime-burden of desecration:
    alien crashing into Dreaming,
    insolent probing into sacred mysteries,
    wanton carving of level boundless vistas
    into finite crude divisions,
    idle parcelling of smooth timelessness
    into crisp hour-glass precisions,
    into ticking clock-wedges,
    brutal shredding with uncaring hands
    of the oldest, longest, wisest
    childhood of the earth.

    In still moments
    you will see again
    the Cave and coiling Serpent:
    into the quiet of a falling dusk,
    into a sleepless hour of the dawn,
    guilt-torn wondering will come.
    Can the Wilyakali
    ever know again
    the mellow flow of time,
    the singing freedom of the Dreamtime,
    the vintage wisdom of their fathers,
    the peace and wholeness
    of a people living
    one-ness with the earth?

    Landscape near Madura, Western Australia

    No Gruner landscape this.
    White sharp-edged rocks and fossil-shells spill
    steeply down the long escarpment:
    mid-day haze blurs lazy clumps
    of squatting summer-dusted salt-bush –
    ink-daubs on a crescent canvas
    stretched taut and dry
    between the escarpment and the ocean.
    Sand-whipped by winds from the south
    low bushes bend in twisted nakedness
    or wear old wigs of matted leaves
    in dusky green and olive.
    All lean to the north.
    Out where white scalloped dunes
    fold in the land
    a thin pure line of emerald sea
    pencils off untainted blue of sky
    streaked with one wisp of sleepy cloud.
    That is the landscape now.
    A fossil-shell
    once live and free on the ocean floor
    now choked with alien sand
    no longer sings into my ear
    its legend of wild waters:
    but deep beneath my feet I think I hear
    the muffled pulse of a kinder earth
    and the faint surge of forgotten seas.

    Winner of the Third Prize in the 1994 Roland Robinson Literary Award for Poetry.


    A Late Love Song

    (excerpt from poem, on the death of her beloved husband) by Huldah M Turner aged 93

    Our bright day closes in:
    The long night will soon begin.
    Then you and I, separate handfuls of a remnant dust,
    swept by the uncaring flow
    of ceaseless rhythms of earth and sea and sky,
    inert, unaware must
    sleep through time.


    A stanza from Elegy

    The spirit has slit its drab cocoon
    to shed the clinging web of flesh.
    Wearied and bruised, it rests; awaits,
    fragile, alone, but free,
    the drift on a mounting tide
    that will ferry it down through a silent tunnel of dark
    to radiant birth
    in the blinding shock of perpetual light.


    What am I crying for?

    (on approaching blindness)

    I cry for the sheen that has gone from the day
    for sharp slant of sun and soft silver moon
    for diamond night canopy spread on the sky
    nuances of light.

    I cry for colour washed out of the world
    for scarlet poinsettias riding the breeze
    for heaped saffron sunset clouds slashed with vermilion
    blue of the sky.

    I cry for loveliness misted and blurred
    for intricate tracery veining a leaf
    for rhythm and dance of a branch blowing high in the wind
    bird on the wing.

    I cry for song-words singing now lost on the page
    for music of phrase flowing over the mind
    for notes on a stave starting echoes and dreaming
    sounds from the deep.

    I cry for gentleness clouded in haze
    for dark of your hair on the pillow beside me
    for tenderness welling in grieving grey eyes
    curve of your smile.

    That is why I am crying.

    Huldah M Turner

    Huldah M Turner

    Huldah Turner

    Huldah Mary Turner

    (1906 – 2006)

    Huldah Mary Turner, former Vice Principal and Acting Principal of Newcastle Teachers’ College, was the first woman in NSW to become Vice Principal and Acting Principal of a Teachers’ College. She was also the first woman on the Council of the University of Newcastle.

    These pages are a tribute to her.