Watt Space Exhibitions

Watt Space 22 February 2018

WATT SPACE GALLERY

EXHIBITIONS

21 February – 11 March 2018

OPENING LAUNCH

Thursday 22 FEB from 6:30pm

  • LIBBY ECKERSLEY – Preparations and de-articulations has the artist working in the context of the gallery space and its visitors to research how these interactions inform decision making and information processing
  • COURTNEY HEFFERNAN – Fanciful Notions investigates childhood rituals, myths and legends that are the essence of human experience, and explores imagination through the rediscovery of story telling.
  • MEGAN MCCARTHY – Fractured Feminism questions the divide between the Feminine and the diverse ideas of Feminism. It represents shattered illusions and stands as a metaphor for resilience and strength.
  • ANNIKA THURBON – I do look like this, I don’t look like this presents self portraits that explore my warped perception of self and the way my mind and my body change from week to week.

Download the Watt Space Invitation 22 FEB 2018

 

Re-stitching Culture

RE-STITCHING CULTURE Doll-making in indigenous cultures

IMAGE: RE-STITCHING CULTURE DOLLS 2017 LEFT – RIGHT Aunty Audree Trindall, Audrey, Aunty Pearl Slater, Mum (Eileen), Arlettha, Johnny, Aunty Shirl Weatherall, My younger self (Shirley), Lyniece Keogh, Will & Tom. Fabric, yarn, threads and filling. Image courtesy Tess Reading

RE-STITCHING CULTURE

Doll-making in Indigenous Cultures

21 FEBRUARY – 18 MARCH 2018

Doll-making is an intrinsic part of many Indigenous cultures across the world, including communities in Australia, Canada and South Africa. In all three cultures, doll-making represents a transfer of cultural knowledge, the building of capacity, and the reclaiming of Indigenous identity, on both a local and a collective level.

The benefits of these outcomes are important to supporting health and wellbeing in Indigenous communities. RE-STITCHING CULTURE showcases examples of doll-making from three Indigenous groups that continue to strengthen their local communities. Specifically, the Gomeroi Yarning dolls (Australia) which encourage the sharing of oral personal narratives; the Six Nations Cornhusk dolls (Canada) to promote the transmission of cultural teachings; and the Siyazama Zulu dolls (South Africa) used to create community support networks through locally relevant HIV/AIDS awareness.

PLEASE JOIN VICE-CHANCELLOR PROFESSOR CAROLINE MCMILLEN FOR THE LAUNCH
THURSDAY 22 FEBRUARY FROM 5:30PM
UNIVERSITY GALLERY

RE-STITCHING CULTURE is supported by the NSW Government through Create NSW, and is a joint project between the Tamworth Regional Gallery, the Gomeroi Gaaynggal Arts Health Program, and The University Gallery, University of Newcastle.

Mystery to be solved

Here’s a mystery for our intrepid historian colleagues.

We would like to know something about the soldier in this photo. Unfortunately, time and other hazards have obscured his face, but we are hoping that someone out there on the Internet may be able to identify his regiment or other army group. We have uploaded a 1200 DPI scan of the full photo to our Flickr site – https://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/39735029291 and 4800 DPI scans showing detail of his shoulders and calves in the hope these may help in the identification.

If you can identify the uniform or unit, please contact archives@newcastle.edu.au

Mojgan Habibi : Behind the words

Mojgan Habibi : Behind the words

MOJGAN HABIBI
BEHIND THE WORDS

31 January – 18 February 2018

Mojgan Habibi’s PhD research is concerned with the use of text by politically motivated Iranian visual artists. Hidden or secondary meanings contained in prose become more evident in times of political or religious censorship, and the use of text in contemporary art can direct the viewer to content beyond the literal meaning. The works in Habibi’s PhD research exhibition, Behind the Words, use metaphor, allegory, poetry and references to Persian mythology and history as vehicles to discuss contemporary Iranian politics. Habibi’s carefully crafted objects and installations are made from clay, some are fired, and all contain textual references ranging from Persian script to abstract calligraphy.

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTIST FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING AT
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY
SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY FROM 1PM
TO BE LAUNCHED BY DR CHRISTOPHER ALLEN

Relive your Uni days!

Opus

Opus – 1965

Reminiscing…

We have just scanned and uploaded copies of the Newcastle University Students’ Association’s magazine, Opus held in the Archives in Cultural Collections. The project team members were Davina Pellatt, Sue Paton, Angus Glasper and Lyn Keily.

There may be some gaps in the collection, so if you have a copy of one of the magazines not represented in Living Histories @ UON, we would be delighted if you would bring it in and allow us to scan and upload it.

Does a story from your student days trigger some memories? Why not share them with us by adding a recollection to Living Histories? See http://livinghistories.newcastle.edu.au/nodes/view/67980 for instructions.

We have also scanned and uploaded the Newcastle University College Students’ Association’s editions of Opus (1954-1964).

Enjoy!

Most popular …

Living Histories@UON

The most frequently visited top ten pages on Living Histories @ UON as of 12:31, 04 August 2017 were:

Page Visits
Robert Oughton Collection 2,101
Hunter Rainbow History Group 1,016
Voices of the Hunter 878
Peter Sansom Collection 873
Interview: Andrew and Bill Whitbread-Brown… 650
Mineworker Interviews 543
Mineworkers, Aberdare North Tunnel. 417
Other Occupations 279
Women Interviews 262
The Scott sisters of Ash Island 252

BAROQUE AND BEYOND

Baroque and Beyond

In 2015, composer David Banney encountered artist Brett McMahon’s installation work for the first time and saw in it the dynamic interplay between symmetry and broken symmetry that he was seeking in his own music. It was then that they discovered the formal and conceptual affinities between their practices and so the present exhibition came to life.

The resulting body of new work is not so much a collaboration as a convergence. Here, two interlocutors share space and time, having departed from the same pre-defined point: the elaboration of six different works, each exploring a distinct texture or emotion. In crafting their separate pieces – McMahon of torn and brooding textiles and assemblages and Banney with surging, audible motifs – their paths converge, cross over, join together, diverge, and collide.

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTISTS FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING AND A PERFORMANCE OF THE WORK BY THE CHRIST CHURCH CAMERATA AT THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY ON WED 9 AUGUST AT 6PM

IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE NEWCASTLE MUSIC FESTIVAL 9 – 20 AUGUST 2017