March Exhibitions at Watt Space

Watt Space March A3 Poster

EXHIBITIONS
14 March – 1 April 2018

OPENING LAUNCH
Thursday 15 MARCH from 6:30pm

Gallery 1 – KATRINA HOLDEN – Conversations with the Land

Conversations with the Land presents the artist’s snapshots and visceral responses to the often overlooked impressions of our beautiful local landscape.

Gallery 2 – ANGUS FOXLEY, ANNIKA LEE, JANE LO, KATE MAHONEY – Abstraction in the creative industries

Abstraction in the creative industries employs techniques used in creative photomedia – composition, colour, line, shape and texture convey emotional responses, engaging audiences with their ideas through abstract photographs.

Gallery 3 – ANNIE COREY – Ghost Stories

Ghost Stories is a collection of works investigating ideas of time, reality and perception. The individual works share common themes of transience with surreal, dream-like qualities.

Media Space – ANDREW STYAN – HUM

HUM the humble power point is the ultimate plug and play device. Behind it lies the most complex machine ever built.

Download MARCH EXHIBITIONS at WATT SPACE

Seeing the Shadow

 

 

PETER TILLEY WEB INVITE

Peter Tilley, Seeing the Shadow II 2017, painted cast iron on polished stainless steel, 43 x 78 x 15 cm.

Peter Tilley

Seeing the Shadow
21 MARCH – 14 APRIL 2018

The elusive, insubstantial nature of the shadow lends itself to metaphor, myth and legend, with its significance contemplated by human consciousness throughout history. Shadows appear as essences of the soul – the externalisation of the inner self – as guides or advisors. In Jungian psychology, shadows contain parts of ourselves that are suppressed, denied, or unfavourable.

For his PhD research, Peter Tilley examines the theory and philosophy of shadow,
developing and utilising an array of materials, found objects, symbols and methods that
enable the construction of shadows to visually or symbolically disclose fundamental traits and mnemonics of the ‘casting’ figure.

The resulting sculptures become complex representations that explore illusions of certainty, memory and imagination – the mysteries of the unknown – and the fundamental identity and attributes of the figure/self.

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTIST FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING AT
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY
SATURDAY 24 MARCH AT 3PM

Peter Tilley is represented by May Space, Sydney

PETER TILLEY WEB INVITE

Watt Space Exhibitions

Watt Space 22 February 2018

WATT SPACE GALLERY

EXHIBITIONS

21 February – 11 March 2018

OPENING LAUNCH

Thursday 22 FEB from 6:30pm

  • LIBBY ECKERSLEY – Preparations and de-articulations has the artist working in the context of the gallery space and its visitors to research how these interactions inform decision making and information processing
  • COURTNEY HEFFERNAN – Fanciful Notions investigates childhood rituals, myths and legends that are the essence of human experience, and explores imagination through the rediscovery of story telling.
  • MEGAN MCCARTHY – Fractured Feminism questions the divide between the Feminine and the diverse ideas of Feminism. It represents shattered illusions and stands as a metaphor for resilience and strength.
  • ANNIKA THURBON – I do look like this, I don’t look like this presents self portraits that explore my warped perception of self and the way my mind and my body change from week to week.

Download the Watt Space Invitation 22 FEB 2018

 

Re-stitching Culture

RE-STITCHING CULTURE Doll-making in indigenous cultures

IMAGE: RE-STITCHING CULTURE DOLLS 2017 LEFT – RIGHT Aunty Audree Trindall, Audrey, Aunty Pearl Slater, Mum (Eileen), Arlettha, Johnny, Aunty Shirl Weatherall, My younger self (Shirley), Lyniece Keogh, Will & Tom. Fabric, yarn, threads and filling. Image courtesy Tess Reading

RE-STITCHING CULTURE

Doll-making in Indigenous Cultures

21 FEBRUARY – 18 MARCH 2018

Doll-making is an intrinsic part of many Indigenous cultures across the world, including communities in Australia, Canada and South Africa. In all three cultures, doll-making represents a transfer of cultural knowledge, the building of capacity, and the reclaiming of Indigenous identity, on both a local and a collective level.

The benefits of these outcomes are important to supporting health and wellbeing in Indigenous communities. RE-STITCHING CULTURE showcases examples of doll-making from three Indigenous groups that continue to strengthen their local communities. Specifically, the Gomeroi Yarning dolls (Australia) which encourage the sharing of oral personal narratives; the Six Nations Cornhusk dolls (Canada) to promote the transmission of cultural teachings; and the Siyazama Zulu dolls (South Africa) used to create community support networks through locally relevant HIV/AIDS awareness.

PLEASE JOIN VICE-CHANCELLOR PROFESSOR CAROLINE MCMILLEN FOR THE LAUNCH
THURSDAY 22 FEBRUARY FROM 5:30PM
UNIVERSITY GALLERY

RE-STITCHING CULTURE is supported by the NSW Government through Create NSW, and is a joint project between the Tamworth Regional Gallery, the Gomeroi Gaaynggal Arts Health Program, and The University Gallery, University of Newcastle.

Mojgan Habibi : Behind the words

Mojgan Habibi : Behind the words

MOJGAN HABIBI
BEHIND THE WORDS

31 January – 18 February 2018

Mojgan Habibi’s PhD research is concerned with the use of text by politically motivated Iranian visual artists. Hidden or secondary meanings contained in prose become more evident in times of political or religious censorship, and the use of text in contemporary art can direct the viewer to content beyond the literal meaning. The works in Habibi’s PhD research exhibition, Behind the Words, use metaphor, allegory, poetry and references to Persian mythology and history as vehicles to discuss contemporary Iranian politics. Habibi’s carefully crafted objects and installations are made from clay, some are fired, and all contain textual references ranging from Persian script to abstract calligraphy.

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTIST FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING AT
THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY
SATURDAY 3 FEBRUARY FROM 1PM
TO BE LAUNCHED BY DR CHRISTOPHER ALLEN

BAROQUE AND BEYOND

Baroque and Beyond

In 2015, composer David Banney encountered artist Brett McMahon’s installation work for the first time and saw in it the dynamic interplay between symmetry and broken symmetry that he was seeking in his own music. It was then that they discovered the formal and conceptual affinities between their practices and so the present exhibition came to life.

The resulting body of new work is not so much a collaboration as a convergence. Here, two interlocutors share space and time, having departed from the same pre-defined point: the elaboration of six different works, each exploring a distinct texture or emotion. In crafting their separate pieces – McMahon of torn and brooding textiles and assemblages and Banney with surging, audible motifs – their paths converge, cross over, join together, diverge, and collide.

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTISTS FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING AND A PERFORMANCE OF THE WORK BY THE CHRIST CHURCH CAMERATA AT THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY ON WED 9 AUGUST AT 6PM

IN ASSOCIATION WITH THE NEWCASTLE MUSIC FESTIVAL 9 – 20 AUGUST 2017

Penny Dunstan – Shadowlands II

Penny Dunstan SHADOWLANDS

PENNY DUNSTAN
SHADOWLANDS II

In the Upper Hunter Valley, open-cut coal mining is transforming what was once agricultural land into unfamiliar landscapes. The trace of history has been severed by industry, to be replaced by shadowlands of our consumerism.

This PhD research exhibition is based upon walking through these hidden places and interacting in this newly manufactured world. It is a record of wayfinding through terraformed land, using drawing, photography, soils and collected artefacts.

Through these works, creative practice co-constitutes post-mining places by transmuting tracks into images and giving interactions form, thereby articulating a way of knowing our shadowlands and making our minescapes matter.

– Penny Dunstan, May 2017

PLEASE JOIN THE ARTIST FOR THE EXHIBITION OPENING
AT THE UNIVERSITY GALLERY ON FRIDAY 21 JULY AT 6PM