The Carrington Albums Visit Newcastle

Item 14 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

Item 14 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

FREE EVENT

VIEWING OF THE CARRINGTON ALBUMS
& PRESENTATION BY DR ANNE LLEWELLYN ON NATURAL HISTORY ILLUSTRATION

WHEN: WEDNESDAY 3RD JUNE 2015
WHERE: CULTURAL COLLECTIONS, LEVEL 2 AUCHMUTY LIBRARY UNIVERSITY OF NEWCASTLE
TIME: 10AM – 12PM
RSVP: archives@newcastle.edu.au or 49215354

View images of the event
View Gregg Heathcote’s photographs:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/sets/72157654562885563

View: Michelle Watson’s Photographs here:
https://picasaweb.google.com/116731994060858524050/CarringtonAlbums3June2015

We are delighted to announce that three of the Carrington Albums containing examples of exquisitely beautiful illuminated addresses produced across Newcastle, Maitland and the wider Hunter Region in the 1880s will be visiting the Newcastle regional repositories of NSW State Records at the University of Newcastle’s Auchmuty Library on the 3rd June 2015 and Newcastle Regional Public Library on the 4th June 2015.

The Carrington Albums were a series of 22 bound volumes of illuminated addresses, containing finely detailed illuminated borders, hand painted illustrations and well-wishing messages from residents, towns and associations across the State in honour of Lord Carrington, who served as Governor from 1885 to 1890.

The beauty of the addresses wonderfully illustrate the respect and love that the people of New South Wales had for Lord Carrington and his wife. The feeling was mutual, and manifested locally. For instance, such was Lady Carrington’s depth of feeling for families, that Lord Carrington made an unsheduled visit to Merewether in Newcastle to help boost the fund raising efforts for the women and children of the men killed in the Hamilton Pit disaster on 22 June 1889.

Funeral of Glebe Pit men, St Augustine's, Merewether, [3 July 1889] (Courtesy of University of Newcastle, Cultural Collections) https://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3342977526

Funeral of Glebe Pit men, St Augustine’s, Merewether, [3 July 1889]
(Courtesy of University of Newcastle, Cultural Collections) https://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/3342977526

The Carrington Volumes accompanied Lord Carrington back to England in 1890, where they remained in Buckinghamshire until they were donated a three years ago to NSW State Records by Lord Carrington’s descendents and the Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies. State Records NSW have been touring these treasures to regional centres and taking those albums containing relevant illuminated addresses back to their place of origin.

It’s now our Hunter Region’s turn, and we have been asked to host a morning event, to allow the wider University and Hunter Regional communities to view these items for the first time in over 125 years. Director of State Records NSW, Geoff Hinchcliffe as well as representatives from State Records NSW will be in attendence.

Three of the volumes will be on display at the University of Newcastle, and a free event will be held in the Friends Reading Room in Cultural Collections, Level 2 Auchmuty Library. Guest speaker will be Dr Anne Llewellyn, Head of School of Design, Communication and IT, who will be speaking on the significance of the volumes with regards to natural history illustration. The University’s Natural Illustration Course is the only course of its kind in an Australian University, and one of a handful worldwide, that brings the talents of artists and scientists together.

All welcome. Please RSVP to archives@newcastle.edu.au or 49215354

Background: http://gallery.records.nsw.gov.au/index.php/galleries/carrington-albums-illuminated-addresses/

Links to sample images from Volume 2:

Cover - Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No.2, containing Colonial views, flowers, birds and insects (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

Cover – Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No.2, containing Colonial views, flowers, birds and insects (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

00 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No.2, containing Colonial views, flowers, birds and insects [Cover]
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21027&format=print

Spine - Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No.2, containing Colonial views, flowers, birds and insects (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

Spine – Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No.2, containing Colonial views, flowers, birds and insects (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

00 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No.2, [spine]
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21028&format=print

Item 09 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Inhabitants of Newcastle and Towns of Surrounding District (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

Item 09 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Inhabitants of Newcastle and Towns of Surrounding District (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

09 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Inhabitants of Newcastle and Towns of Surrounding District
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21040&format=print

Item 10 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Inhabitants of Newcastle and Towns of Surrounding District (Courtesy NSW State Records)

Item 10 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Inhabitants of Newcastle and Towns of Surrounding District (Courtesy NSW State Records)

10 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Inhabitants of Newcastle and Towns of Surrounding District
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21041&format=print

Item 11 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District (Courtesy of NSw State Records)

Item 11 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District (Courtesy of NSw State Records)

11 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21042&format=print

12 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

12 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

12 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21043&format=print

13 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District (Courtesy of NSw State Records)

13 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District (Courtesy of NSw State Records)

13 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the People of East Maitland, West Maitland, Morpeth and District
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21044&format=print

14 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

14 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

14 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21045&format=print

15 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

15 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland (Courtesy of NSW State Records)

15 Addresses Presented to Lord Carrington Governor of New South Wales 1886 No. 2, Address From the Residents of Maitland
http://investigator.records.nsw.gov.au/Entity.aspx?Path=\Image\21046&format=print

Reconciliation and NAIDOC Weeks 2011

To acknowledge Reconciliation Week 2011 a gathering was held to ‘talk recognition’ under the mirror ball of the Auchmuty Library with a piece of Italian continental cake (specially made for the occasion), and to launch the Exhibition comprising archival material and books and items kindly loaned to us by Mr Paul F. Walsh and Susan Harvey relating to their nationally acknowledged work towards reconciliation in the Hunter.

At the conclusion of the event both Paul F Walsh and Mr Rodney Knock said a few words regarding their reconciliation work in the Hunter Region.

The Novocastrian Tales and Currawong Projects

Novocastrian Tales, created, published, co-written and edited by Paul F Walsh was a national bestseller. The Novocastrian Tales project raised over $600 000 to build Yallarwah Place, the Aboriginal Accommodation Centre at John Hunter Hospital in Newcastle. Yallarwah Place serves the Aboriginal communities of Northern NSW.

Mr Walsh created and directed the Currawong Project during the Centenary of Federation Year. The Currawong Project was a national reconciliation project featuring the Currawong Exhibition, opened by NSW Governor Marie Bashir, and inspired by the novel Black Feather White Feather by Paul F Walsh.

The Currawong Project inspired such notables as Sir William Deane, Governor General of Australia, Marie Bashir, Governor of NSW, Bob Carr, Premier of NSW, et al, to plant trees with local Aboriginal people at the Bicentenary Memorial at Yallarwah Place. The Yallarwah Bicentenary Memorial is believed to be among the first united Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal memorials in Australia.

The memorial concept, design and symbolism were co-created by Paul F Walsh and Aboriginal author Ray Kelly. The reconciliation partnership of these two men throughout the Novocastrian Tales and Currawong projects was said to be reminiscent of the co-creative aspects of the relationship between Biraban and the Reverend Lancelot Threlkeld in colonial times.

Mr Walsh recalls: ‘It was Susan Harvey who slammed a coffee cup onto our kitchen bench and said: “Why don’t you create something with a team for a change?” It was Susan Harvey who co-published Novocastrian Tales and who organized us all. Without Susan Harvey there would be no Novocastrian Tales and there would have been no Currawong Project.’

Susan Harvey recalls: ‘It was one of those unique and joyful times in Novocastrian history when the disparate tribes within our community united to achieve a reconciling outcome via a reconciling process. Novocastrian Tales was a meeting point of three continuous processes of reconciliation. The most obvious of these is reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians.

The least obvious, perhaps, is reconciliation between left and right political traditions. And the third is reconciliation of the past, present and future.’

I plant this tree in the spirit of
the currawong,
black feather white feather
lifting me.
I plant this tree to call upon
all Australians
to replant
a shared future together.

The  letter below that was written by Mr Paul F. Walsh to the future editor of Novocastrian Tales for the Tercentenary of Newcastle. The letter, along with the two new tales being submitted, is held in the Novocastrian Tales time capsule at Newcastle Region Library. It defines much of what Susan and Paul embrace in terms of reconciliation as an eternal process.

The Editor
Novocastrian Tales
Newcastle-Hunter Tercentenary edition
1797 – 2097

Heart of our nation

Dear Sir/Madam

I respectfully submit Newcastle and The Mathematics of Life for possible inclusion in the Tercentenary edition of Novocastrian Tales.

These submissions reflect my view that reconciliation is a continuous and expansive process, a limitless journey without maps or discrete destination. This seems true to me whether we are talking of reconciliation between indigenous and non-indigenous Australians, male and female, old and young, left and right, gay and straight, Islamic and non-Islamic, believers and non-believers, socialists and capitalists, global warmers and global coolers or teachers and students.

These submissions also reflect my sense of humour where no political cow is too sacred and every dog has her day. The failed politics of reconciliation has thus far spawned Aboriginal deaths in custody, homophobia, sexism, ageism, Global Warming, the Tampa, the War on Terror, a decaying education system and the victory of spin over truth. This list is not exhaustive but it is exhausting. I find myself breathless in a wardrobe, with a world I no longer recognize outside. Like the anonymous errorist who finds it hard to reconcile his current circumstance I am the only one left. And then in that wardrobe I discover there are people like me beyond the wardrobe. I find myself reconnecting with all that is good in my various lives. I see Nobbys, a navigational beacon reconciling us all, I see the giant black kangaroo, and I see my myriad selves taking up their quills.

I am sure that reconciliation manifests in your world in as many contexts as it does in mine. And yet all these personal reconciliation journeys without limit or destination make no sense to me, unless we are finding out who we are along the continuum. Each of us by virtue of our common humanity is walking the path of reconciliation whether we recognize the process or not. Maybe we are Simon, the brilliant young student, or maybe we are the anonymous errorist, or maybe we are an infinite number of selves trying to reconcile with each other through the fluttering of our quills.

Whoever we are, or are becoming, we are writers, you and I, separated by time and circumstance, but not by place or sense of mission. We are united in a common quest. We seek to reconcile the past, present and future. Perhaps it is a foolish quest, but it is an honest quest, and in that quest we may chronicle our emerging selves.

I wish you well on your editorial journey.

Heart of our nation
Reconciliation

Paul F Walsh OAM
The Medal of the Order of Australia
Newcastle Citizen of the Year 2001
The Premier’s Award for Community Service
Australian Reconciliation Award
Editor
Novocastrian Tales
Newcastle-Hunter Bicentenary 1797 – 1997

Dated this 5th day of September 2007
on the occasion of the tenth birthday of the Bicentenary edition of Novocastrian Tales.

 

 

Yallarwah Place - An Act of Reconciliation

This was truly a magnificent day. On Friday 19th February 1999 Yallarwah Place was officially opened and born to the Community of the Hunter Region. Yallarwah Place is an accommodation centre for the families of Aboriginal people from the communities of the Hunter and Northern NSW who are receiving medical care at the John Hunter Hospital. It will also serve non-indigenous families as the need arises and is believed to be the first such facility in Australia. It also stands as the first physical act of reconciliation between the black and white cultures in this country. In the words of Aboriginal Elder, Uncle Bob Smith, and Ray Kelly, Chief Executive Officer of the Awabakal Co-operative, it represents black and white people coming together, working together to achieve one goal. If this is what dreams can do, then let’s have more dreaming!

Yallarwah is an Awabakal word meaning ‘resting place’. It is a place of healing and rest for people and also for the land which we share. Yallarwah was made possible through the vision and dreams of author Paul Walsh who created and directed the Novocastrian Tales project for the Newcastle-Hunter Bicentenary 1797-1997. The funds raised from the sale of the book, along with a generous contribution from the State Government of NSW and many corporate and community benefactors helped make the dream into reality. The Archives, Rare Books and Special Collections Unit of the Auchmuty Library is honored to have played a part in this very important event through the preparation of the portraits of Biraban and The Reverend Lancelot Threlkeld whose relationship spawned the inspiration behind the memorial. These framed works along with the bronze book and plaque, created by Vlase Nikoleski, Head of the School of Fine Art, formed the University of Newcastle’s gift to the project.

Order of Ceremonies

The Opening Ceremony for Yallarwah Place was created by Paul F Walsh and Susan Harvey

The Aboriginal Smoking Ceremony

Aboriginal Smoking Ceremony

Upon arrival the guests were invited to pass through the smoke of the Yallarwah campfire as a ritual of purification and unity. The Smoking Ceremony was performed by the respected Aboriginal Elder Uncle Bill Smith, with assistance from Mimaga Wajar (Mother Earth) Traditional Custodians, Michael Moran, William Smith and Malcolm Smith.

Eagle-Hawk Mosaic

A Prayer of the Smoke Uncle Bill Smith, Aboriginal Elder

For thousands of years the campfire of our ancestors marked their places of rest and celebration in this Hunter Valley. May the glowing of this fire remind us of the Father’s love for us and our love for one another. As the smoke from this sacred campfire rises into the sky like Biraban, the Eagle-Hawk, may it drive away all the evil spirits and bring us together as one to enter into this service of Dedication.

Acknowledgment of the Ancestors of the Awabakal

Ray Kelly, Chief Executive Officer of the Awabakal Cooperative. Ray spoke of invitation for the presence of the ancestral spirits.

The Prologue from Novocastrian Tales

Words by Paul F Walsh, narrated by Graham Wilson, produced by Professor Robert Constable. A beautiful piece, complimented with the intrusion of a mobile phone, performed by an impromptu embarrassed anonymous owner.

More Than Ever

A piece of music composed for the dedication ceremony by Keith Potger, Trevor Spencer and Boyd Wilson. It was performed by Keith Potger. I wondered who this fellow was, he looked familiar…”was he from Redgum?”. I learn he is from the legendary Australian group The Seekers. Sorry Keith.

Uncle Bob Smith and Ray Kelly

Both these men spoke from the heart concerning the past difficulties encountered in accommodating the Aboriginal families of loved ones in hospital.Uncle Bob spoke of how he once asked the Government for a “house and a bus”, they refused. For 15 or so years he carried the dream alive for a special place, and was tearfully joyous at now seeing it become a reality.

Vice-Chancellor Roger Holmes Addresses the gathering

Professor Roger Holmes

The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Newcastle spoke of the history and the University’s gift to Yallarwah Place.

The Dedication

The Hon Andrew Refshauge MP

After being introduced by John Mills MP, The Honourable Dr Andrew Refshauge MP, Deputy Premier of NSW officially opened Yallarwah Place and dedicates the Yallarwah site as a Bicentenary Memorial for the people of the Hunter Region.

Opening Prayer

Jean Hands, Upper Hunter Aboriginal Liaison Officer, Hunter Health

A reading from the Gospel of St Luke

Read in Awabakal by Ray Kelly. This translation into Awabakal was made between 1827 and 1831 by the Reverend Lancelot Threlkeld and the famed Awabakal man, Biraban, in the Newcastle/Lake Macquarie Area. Following Ray Kelly’s reading, the Gospel was read in English by Pastor Rex Morgan, Susan Harvey and Jane Gray.

Prayers of Blessing

Most Reverend Michael Malone, Catholic Bishop of Maitland and Newcastle blessed the container of waters drawn from the sources of the Northern Rivers by tribal Elders. Respected Aboriginal Elder Uncle Bill Smith, dusts the waters with smoke. The Right Reverend Roger Herft, Anglican Bishop of Newcastle, blessed a container of soils drawn from the lands of the North by tribal Elders. Respected Aboriginal Elder Uncle Bill Smith dusted the soils with smoke. Ray Kelly, lead Aboriginal Elder Uncle Bill Smith and the two Bishops, to smoke and bless the building. This was followed by the Rainbow Spirit Prayer.

Yallarwah Place

The facility utilised Aboriginal design elements in its construction. It is shaped in the form of an Eagle-Hawk astride a flying boomerang. At this point in the Ceremony the guests form a symbolic Rainbow Serpent/Hunter River. The Bishops, Uncle Bob Smith and Uncle Bill Smith are guided to the River where they enter the symbolic canoe.

Rowing Down the River

Dancers en route to the Circle of Reflection

The Dancers create a symbolic canoe and row down the River with the crowd following behind. They chant the Bellingen Boat Song (composed by Lennie de Silva). The Yallarwah Bicentenary Walk was blessed and smoked.

Warriors around the Circle

The canoe is challenged by two didgeridoo players who guard the Rainbow Serpent’s Head / Newcastle Harbour. The canoe stops and the Bishops, Uncle Bill Smith and Uncle Bob Smith enter the Yallarwah Circle of Reflection. Uncle Bill Smith smokes the bronze book and the Circle while the Bishops distribute the blessed water. Uncle Bob Smith distributes the tribal soils within the circle as a symbol that all peoples are welcome at this place of healing. The guests were then allowed into the Circle.

The Bronze Book

Within the clearing there  is a circle of six large stones, reminiscent of the Awabakal’s stone circle arrangements observed by the Reverend Lancelot Threlkeld in 1825-1826. In the centre of the stones there is a seventh stone with a bronze book. The right-hand page reads: ‘Yallarwah Circle of Reflection. In memory of the Aboriginal people, European settlers and convicts who lived and died in our shared Hunter History 1797-1997’. The left-hand page reads: “‘On enquiry of my black tutor, M’Gill, he informed me that the tradition was, that the Eagle-Hawks brought these stones and placed them together…’ Reverend Lancelot Threlkeld 1825-1826. Novocastrian Tales”.

Framed portraits of Biraban and ThrelkeldThe framed portraits of Biraban (or M’Gill) and The Rev. Lancelot Threlkeld

The Kookaburra Mosaic

The Coming of the Tribes

The coming together of the tribes.

Carol Abela and Phillip Towney

Carol Abela, Chairperson of Hunter Area Health, and Phillip Towney, Aboriginal Liaison Officer, John Hunter Hospital and Manager of Yallarwah Place spoke of the design of the building and its connective attributes to the four elements.

Howard Frith and Paul F Walsh

Howard Firth, Managing Director of the Newcastle Permanent Building Society, talked of his first meeting with Paul, and how it resembled a wonderful plot to a great tale. He spoke of how his head was saying “No! No! No!” while his heart was saying “Yes! Yes! Yes!” Paul spoke of his inspirational relationship with his wife and paid tribute to his wife’s mother and former business partner. He thanked everyone involved with the project, named and unnamed.

The Epilogue from Novocastrian Tales

Words by Paul F Walsh
Narrated by Paul F Walsh and Ray Kelly

Two hundred years
Fifty thousand years!
Two hundred years
Fifty thousand tears
Our river flows
Our river knows
Heart of our nation
Reconciliation

At this point I beheld the spirits of both Threlkeld and Biraban.

Gionni Di Gravio 20th February, 1999

Sources:

Programme – Yallarwah Place 1797-1997, by Paul F Harvey and Susan Harvey, Newcastle, Elephant Press, 1999.

An Australian Language as spoken by the Awabakal The People of Awaba or Lake Macquarie (Near Newcastle, New South Wales) being an Account of Their Language, Traditions, and Customs: by L.E. Threlkeld. Rearranged, condensed, and edited, with an Appendix, by John Fraser, B.A., LL.D., Sydney, 1892.

Australian Reminiscences & Papers of L.E.Threlkeld, Missionary to the Aborigines, 1824-1859. 2 vols, ed. Niel Gunson, Canberra, 1974.

Towards UoN50

Newcastle University Establishment Group inspects proposed site for the University, early 1960s.

The University of Newcastle has a rich history. In 2011 we will launch a major project for staff, students and the community that captures our unique past. Towards UoN50 will chronicle and celebrate the milestones, as well as the little known facts, that have made the University what it is today.

The Website is here: http://www.newcastle.edu.au/about/UoN50.html

As we approach our 50th anniversary in 2015 we want to work with students, staff, alumni, volunteer and support groups, and the community who have all had a hand in shaping the institution.

We want to hear your stories.

Towards UoN50 will be celebrated in many ways. There will be permanent and temporary displays across campuses of historical objects and photographs that showcase the University. All current schools and divisions will be involved and can nominate key people, achievements and objects that they consider are an important part of their history.

A working party, chaired by Emeritus Professor Adrian Page, has been established to guide the project. In addition to the on-campus displays, the Working Party will commission a writer to document the past 50 years. The Herald will also regularly feature highlights from Towards UoN50.

Soon you will see Towards UoN50 taking shape with displays in our libraries, and in the School of Education and the School of Environmental and Life Sciences.

Take a look at some of the early photographs on Flickr photo sharing application where over 10,000 images related to the University have been uploaded by Peter Longworth, who volunteers with the Cultural Collections. The Conferring of Degree (Graduation) Booklets (1959-2009) , the University Gazette (1966 to 1988) and University News (1970 to 1974) have been digitised and are also available online.

This is an exciting and important project for the University and the community. We need your ideas and feedback to make it a success so please contact the team at UoN50@newcastle.edu.au

Claudia Coutu Radmore Book Reading

Arctic Twilight cover Claudia Coutu Radmore

BOOK READING

CLAUDIA COUTU RADMORE

Wednesday 23 February 2011

Cultural Collections Reading Room
Level 2, Auchmuty Library

10:00 – 11:00 am
followed by morning tea

Claudia Coutu Radmore, winner of the 2009 National Capital Canadian Author’s Award for Poetry, will read excerpts from her latest works, Arctic Twilight and a minute or two/without remembering and discuss the books and her writing.

Arctic Twilight recounts the life of Leonard Budgell who ran the Hudson’s Bay Company trading posts for decades in isolated communities up the Labrador coast and across the Arctic. he chronicles, in an outpouring of letters to a much younger female friend, a traditional way of life that was changing forever.

a minute or two / without remembering covers the history of New France, the settlement of the area around Montreal, Quebec between the years 1672 and 1790. The voices that tell the stories, and of the history, conflict, news stories and cultural development of those times are women, men, children, soldiers erc who are her actual ancestors, members of the Coutu family.

Claudia Coutu Radmore is also a writer of Japanese-form poetry. She is a teacher, artist and writer who has lived in China and the South Pacific, and now lives near Ottawa.

All are welcome to attend the reading.

Macquarie 2010 Art Exhibitions

Two Macquarie 2010 artist exhibitions will be launched this week.

The Nobbys Children’s Art Exhibition featuring the work of 24 children who have produced a series of artworks depicting Nobbys and Macquarie Pier will be launched on the 9th April 2010 at Wallsend Public Library.

Nobbys Children’s Art Exhibition Launch Brochure (PDF Download)

This particular event has two parts, a children’s art workshop followed by an exhibition.  On 19 January 2010,  24 children worked with artists from ‘Arts Emporium’, under the lead of Julie-Ann Ure, to produce work interpreting the sites of Nobbys and Macquarie Pier, as well as learning about Macquarie’s work.  The children got to paint, draw, sculpt and work together on a body of work that has culminated in this exhibition.

Later in the evening the second exhibition is the National Trust’s  The Making of Our Nation: Art Exhibition involving local artists who were  were invited to interpret the theme. Exhibition will be opened by Mr Ron Ramsey Director of Newcastle Region Art Gallery on Friday 9 April at 6.00pm. John Paynter Gallery, The Lockup, 90 Hunter Street Newcastle.

Making of Our Nation Flyer and invitation