Local Treasures: Greg Heys (1945-2007) Unfinished Doctoral Thesis Launch

The Late Greg Heys (1945-2007)

The Late Greg Heys (1945-2007)

Day Shift – 21/10/2014 – 02:10 PM
Presenter: Carol Duncan
Interviewees: Wendy Heys, Dr Bernie Curran and Gionni Di Gravio, Archivist, University of Newcastle (Australia)

Wendy Heys, wife of former Lord Mayor and University of Newcastle academic Greg Heys, Dr Bernie Curran and Gionni Di Gravio (Archivist) discuss the launch of Greg Heys unpublished and unfinished doctoral thesis on Democratic Governance and Sustainable Regional Development through the University of Newcastle Libraries.

Broadcast Notes:

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD GREG HEYS’ THESIS

FREE DOWNLOAD – Democratic Governance for Sustainable Regional Development. Theorising Regional Development Governance Processes for Achieving Ecologically Sustainable Development Objectives in the Hunter Region of New South Wales. By Greg Heys BSW (UNSW) MUrbStud (Macquarie) June 2007. (921KB PDF File)

From Wendy Heys and the Heys Family on behalf of the Editorial Team of Judy Conway, Dr Bernie Curran, Professor Brian English, Dr Moira Gordon AM and Len Regan. 

You are invited to the launch of the unfinished doctoral thesis of former Lord Mayor of Newcastle and University academic Greg Heys entitled ‘Democratic Governance for Sustainable Regional Development’.

By the time of his death in 2007, Greg had conducted a unique set of interviews with ‘champions for the Hunter’ and commenced writing his analysis based upon these.

Greg’s vision for regional development governance in the Hunter, together with the diverse understandings and motivations of the interviewees, underpins the thesis and justifies the decision to edit and publish Greg’s work in order to make it available for others.

The work will be launched by Professor Brian English, long-time friend and academic colleague of Greg at 5.30 PM, Wednesday 29th October 2014 in the Friends of the University Reading Room, Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library at the University of Newcastle, Callaghan. ALL WELCOME.

Please RSVP to Dr Bernie Curran on (02) 49217453 or email bernard.curran@newcastle.edu.au

 

Editorial Team (l-r) Judy Conway, Dr Moira Gordon AM, Wendy Heys, Dr Bernie Curran, Len Regan and Professor Brian English at Launch of Greg Heys Unfinished Thesis on Democratic Governance 29th October 2014.

Editorial Team (l-r) Judy Conway, Dr Moira Gordon AM, Wendy Heys, Dr Bernie Curran, Len Regan and Professor Brian English at Launch of Greg Heys Unfinished Thesis on Democratic Governance 29th October 2014.

Professor Brian English addresses crowd which Wendy Heys with grand child and Dr Bernard Curran look on at Launch of Greg Heys Unfinished Thesis on Democratic Governance 29th October 2014.

Professor Brian English addresses crowd which Wendy Heys with grand child and Dr Bernard Curran look on at Launch of Greg Heys Unfinished Thesis on Democratic Governance 29th October 2014.

For further images from the Heys Family Collection please see our flickr site:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/uon/sets/72157648992815155/


Personal Profile – Greg Heys

Greg Heys was born on the 28th February 1945 in Sydney Australia. He married Wendy and had two children Sarah and Matthew, as well as two grandchildren. The family moved to Newcastle in 1982, and Greg lived there with his family until his death in 2007.

Greg matriculated from the Christian Brothers High School, Lewisham in 1962 and undertook theological studies for six years.

In 1972, Greg graduated from the University of New South Wales with a Bachelor of Social Work Degree.

Greg Heys Graduation as Bachelor of Social Work (UNSW) with wife Wendy and baby Sarah,  May 1973. (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg Heys Graduation as Bachelor of Social Work (UNSW) with wife Wendy and baby Sarah, May 1973. (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

In 1990 he completed a Masters of Urban Studies from Macquarie University. His thesis analysed regional development policy in the Hunter Region from the 1970s through the 1980s.

From 1973 to 1976 Greg worked as the first appointed Community Development Officer with Orange City Council where he established and managed a range of services such as neighborhood centers and child and youth facilities in new suburbs. From 1976 to 1980 he became Social Planner with the Bathurst-Orange Development Corporation, providing advice and identifying where social and community facilities needed to be established for the new population areas. From 1981 to 1982 he worked as a Regional Social Work Advisor for the heath Commission of New South Wales Central Western Region, Orange establishing social working networks, planning and facilities across health and related social welfare issues.

The family then moved to Newcastle, and from 1982 to 1988 Greg worked for the NSW Department of Community Services. He managed the Hunter Social Development Program for three years where he also provided advice on establishing and funding community services such as children’s services, transport and services for the elderly and women and youth refuges. Later he set up and managed the Home and Community Care program throughout the Hunter Region.

In 1988 Greg joined the staff of the Hunter Institute of Higher Education (HIHE) as a lecturer, where he taught students in the Bachelor of Social Science (Welfare). After the HIHE amalgamated with the University of Newcastle in 1989, he held a lecturer position in the Social Work Department at the University until his retirement in March 2000.

Greg Heys standing for Newcastle as  Australian Labor Party candidate (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg Heys standing for Newcastle as Australian Labor Party candidate (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

From 1991 to 1999, Greg entered local politics and was elected as a Labor councillor on Newcastle City Council. From 1995 to 1999 he was the popularly elected Lord Mayor of Newcastle.

Greg Heys as Lord Mayor of Newcastle circa 1995 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg Heys as Lord Mayor of Newcastle circa 1995 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg with former Lord Mayor Joy Cummings and wife Wendy, c1995 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg with former Lord Mayor Joy Cummings and wife Wendy, c1995 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

In this capacity he was a director on the Honeysuckle Development Corporation and the Chairman of the Hunter Waste Planning and Management Board as well as serving on many committees. His leadership as Lord Mayor saw the hugely successful and groundbreaking Pathways to Sustainability Conference here in 1997, positioned Newcastle to be head of the pack of all other Australian cities in pursuing ecologically sustainable development policies and practices in the late 1990s.

Greenhouse Challenge 1997 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greenhouse Challenge 1997 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Pathways to Sustainability Conference 1997 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greenhouse Challenge 1997 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

The Newcastle Declaration Endorsed at the International Conference Pathways to Sustainability 1-5 June 1997.

The Newcastle Declaration Endorsed at the International Conference Pathways to Sustainability 1-5 June 1997.

Commitment by Newcastle City Council to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of the City of Newcastle. 14th April 1998.

Commitment by Newcastle City Council to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples of the City of Newcastle. 14th April 1998.

Greg with Prime Minister John Howard, circa 1998.

Greg with Prime Minister John Howard, circa 1998.

 

Greg lost the election in 1999 to incoming Lord Mayor John Tate. He was missed by many people who are reported to have said that he was “the best Lord Mayor of Newcastle ever”, as the following letter from a young Jonathan Moylan says:

Letter from Jonathan Moylan to Mr Heys 15th September 1999 (Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Letter from Jonathan Moylan to Mr Heys 15th September 1999 (Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Following his retirement from the University in March 2000, Greg then enrolled in a PhD researching governance models for sustainable regional development.

On the 29th August 2002 he was honored with being awarded The Newcastle Medal

Newcastle Medal awarded to Greg Heys in 2002

Newcastle Medal awarded to Greg Heys in 2002

While researching and writing his PhD, Greg worked in the Premiers Department of NSW as the senior project manager for the Hunter Community Renewal Scheme where he focussed on collaborating with 28 government not-for-profit organizations and community groups in delivering an eight pronged strategy to “improve the quality of life in Windale”.

Windale community thanks Greg Heys with honor board at Tree of Gratitude August 2007.

Windale community thanks Greg Heys with honor board at Tree of Gratitude August 2007.

Following this project he worked for Mission Australia between August 2004 to November 2005 to assess the feasibility of and to set up the Hunter Community Foundation over an 18 month contract. In 2006 he founded the Friends of the Regal Group to campaign to restore the community cinema that faced hard times.

Greg with Bruce Avard out the front of the Regal Cinema Birmingham Gardens in 2006.

Greg with Bruce Avard out the front of the Regal Cinema Birmingham Gardens in 2006.

From January 2007 and just prior to his death Greg was the Community Development and Planning Officer with Port Stephens Council implementing Council’s community and sustainable planning program.

Greg died aged 62 years on the 5th June 2007 at the Calvary Mater Hospital, after suffering a massive heart attack days before. The funeral was held on the 13th June 2007 at Our Lady of Victories Church in Shortland.

"Heys' talent for helping people" Daily Telegraph 6 June 2007

“Heys’ talent for helping people” Daily Telegraph 6 June 2007

"Farewell to Greg Heys" Newcastle Herald Editorial June 6th 2007

“Farewell to Greg Heys” Newcastle Herald Editorial June 6th 2007

"Death saddens city"Newcastle herald June 6the 2007 p.13

“Death saddens city”Newcastle herald June 6the 2007 p.13

Peter Lewis Cartoon published Newcastle Herald 11th June 2007 (With permission of Peter Lewis)

Peter Lewis Cartoon published Newcastle Herald 11th June 2007 (With permission of Peter Lewis)

"He sparked Newcastle's recovery" Sydney Morning Herald 17th June 2007

“He sparked Newcastle’s recovery” Sydney Morning Herald 17th June 2007

"Short, rich life an inspiration. Hundreds farewell man of integrity" Newcastle Herald 14th June 2007

“Short, rich life an inspiration. Hundreds farewell man of integrity” Newcastle Herald 14th June 2007

It was during the funeral service that his son Matthew lamented that his father had not finished his PhD on regional development, the final chapter was near completion when he died.

Wendy and Greg Heys circa 1997 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Wendy and Greg Heys circa 1997 (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

And it was to this end that a committed group of Greg’s friends and academic colleagues, led by his dedicated wife, Wendy, applied their minds and skills to editing and bringing the incomplete doctoral thesis to a point where it could be made available to the wider academic and regional communities of the Hunter and beyond.

The work can be downloaded directly from the link at the top of this post. It has also been uploaded into the University Libraries Encore database here:

http://encore.newcastle.edu.au/iii/cpro/DigitalItemViewPage.external?sp=1012409&sp=T

and shortly be also available in the NOVA Digital Repository here:

http://nova.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/manager/Index

Greg Heys left a great legacy of service to the communities he served both as a committed social worker, University academic and political representative, please join us in celebrating the life and work of this remarkable man.

Greg photographed at his 60th birthday in 2005. (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg photographed at his 60th birthday in 2005. (Photo: Courtesy of Wendy Heys)

WHEN: 5.30 PM, Wednesday 29th October 2014

WHERE: Friends of the University Reading Room, Cultural Collections, Auchmuty Library at the University of Newcastle, Callaghan.

ALL WELCOME.

Please RSVP to Dr Bernie Curran on (02) 49217453 or email bernard.curran@newcastle.edu.au

Greg Heys in the Kimberley 2003 (Photo courtesy of Wendy Heys)

Greg Heys in the Kimberley 2003 (Photo courtesy of Wendy Heys)

 

For further research into the professional research work of Greg Heys please consult the Greg Heys Planning Collection held in Local Studies, Newcastle Public Library, Laman Street Newcastle.

A link to the holdings is here: http://www.newcastle.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/232551/Greg_Heys_Planning_Collection.pdf

4 thoughts on “Local Treasures: Greg Heys (1945-2007) Unfinished Doctoral Thesis Launch

  1. Greg Hayes – what a great guy, and great leader. I remember the “Pathways to Sustainability” conference, it was such an important benchmark for possibilities in the Hunter, and it had wide positive impact on local government implementation at a time when I was researching this topic, and needed this inspiration. This was a time when Newcastle Council seemed to gave a big heart.

    I know how hard it is to put Sustainable Development into practice when the political agenda of the leadership is not engaged. Unless Newcastle and Lake Macquarie vote wisely on October 25 it will be a long time before we see true sustainability again.

    Thanks to UON Cultural Collections for putting the article together. I am looking forward to reading Greg Hayes’ doctoral thesis as I am sure it has retained it’s relevance today.

  2. This is such a loving tribute to Greg. He made a difference to the lives of such a diverse group of people and was admired and respected by our whole community. Thank you Wendy for persevering through a most difficult time to get his achievements out there, so that others might continue his good work.

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