2nd B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Voyage to Antarctica

Ice Crystals

ABC Newcastle (Newcastle)
Day Shift – 15/05/2007 – 02:10 PM
Presenter: Carol Duncan

Newcastle University Archivist Gionni Di Gravio describes and discusses the photographs of the Australian, New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition in 1929-31 donated to the University. Talks about who took the pictures saying some of them are annotated. Comments on the significance of the BANZARE voyage in relation to the territorial claim to Antarctica by Australia. Comments on the significance of history.

Interviewees: Gionni Di Gravio, Archivist, Newcastle University
Duration: 14:49

Broadcast Notes:

We were fortunate to have had a set of Antarctic images donated to us as part of a larger collection of archives from Mr Jim Downie of Mayfield.

These images were given to Jim Downie’s father, Alexander Downie, by a member of the British Antarctic Expedition but he was unsure of the individual. Alexander Downie travelled out to Australia around 1904 with members of the Shackleton’s expedition. He remained in contact with many of the members. In 1907 the British Antarctic Expedition led by Ernest Shackleton reached the South Magnetic Pole in King George V land.

Sir Douglas Mawson (1882 -1958) returned to Antarctica in 1911-1914 with the Australian Antarctic Expedition with the objective of further exploration and mapping.

Mawson again returned to the Antarctic in 1929-1931 with the assistance of the Australian National Research Council and Australian Government that allowed him to organise the British, Australian and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition (B.A.N.Z.A.R.E.). (Ref: The Winning of Australian Antarctica by A Grenfell Price. Sydney, 1962:v)

It was only after examining the written captions on the back of the images that we realised that the images were taken on the second BANZARE voyage from 1930-1931. But unfortunately the mystery photographer and writer only ever referred to himself as ‘self’ and never by his real name.

Self aka W. Howard
“Self” (William E. Howard)

There were, however, clues to his identity. He bore some resemblance to J.W.S. Marr, Zoologist on the expedition. However once we had located a specimen of Marr’s handwriting it did not appear to match the annotations on the back of the photographs. Our next possible candidate was Dr Alf Howard, as one of the photographs along with the BANZARE images was of a woman marked “Sister. Miss Nell. Howard”. The photographs of ‘self’ did not look anything like Dr Howard.

I contacted Dr Anna Bemrose, a close associate of Dr Howard’s and a scholar at the University of Queensland who has organised exhibitions on Dr Howard’s work. She said that Dr Howard did not have a sister. After ruling out members of the scientific team, she suggested that the possible candidate was a member of the crew. Once a check of the crew was made she turned up a ‘W. Howard’ who was aboard the Discovery. It was in all probability the real identity of ‘self’ and his photographs that became an unofficial record of this particular voyage from a crew member’s perspective. We sincerely thank Dr Bemrose for helping us in identifying this individual. Thanks also to Sally Douglas for identification of his middle initial, that we initially thought was “William F.” to be “William E.” She found confirmation in the May 1 1934 Edition of the London Gazette backed up in this 1934 article located on TROVE here: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article33009941

How they came to be deposited in Mayfield was another mystery. After the radio show Mr Downie rang to suggest a possible explanation. Mr Alexander Downie was a native of Coatbridge, Scotland. He said that Scottish people kept in contact when ever they travelled abroad, and that perhaps William Howard was also a native of this town and that he deposited the photographs on one of these visits to Newcastle.

So if there are any relatives of William Howard, a possible native of Coatbridge Scotland, who was a crew member on the Discovery on the second B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyage 1930-1931, we would like to hear from them.

With regards to the images listed below I have endeavoured to list them as best as possible. I welcome any suggestions or comments relating to the order of the images. I have used as my reference two diary accounts of the Voyage by Mawson:

Mawson, Douglas. “The B.A.N.Z. Antarctic Research Expedition, 1929-1931” in The Geographical Journal, Vol. 80, No.2 (Aug, 1932), pp.101-126.

British, Australian, and New Zealand Antarctic Research Expedition, (1929-1931)
The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962]

Annotations on the reverse sides of some of the photographs in the hand of ‘self’ are in inverted commas.

Gionni Di Gravio
University of Newcastle

____________________________

BRITISH, AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND ANTARCTIC RESEARCH EXPEDITION (B.A.N.Z.A.R.E.)

2ND VOYAGE 22 NOVEMBER 1930 – 19 MARCH 1931

(Donated by Mr Jim Downie, Mayfield)

Short Description:
A6590(iv) Photographs of Second B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Voyage to Antarctica 22nd November 1930 to 19th March 1931, taken by William E. Howard, crew member of the Discovery.

Full Description:
A6590 (iv) Box of original photographs belonging to W. Howard, crew member of the Discovery including those taken of Mawson’s Second B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Voyage from Hobart, 22nd November 1930 to Hobart, 19th March 1931. Others include images taken at a variety of locations such as Panama Canal, Boat Harbour New Zealand, Wellington (2nd July 1931), island of Curacao West Indies, Brazil and Monte Video South America, Mr W.F. Porteus “Lost at sea Falkland Islands. South America 1931.” Cape Raoul, Storm Bay, Derwent River Tasmania, Freemantle and Geralton Western Australia, Wentworth Prison Victoria, Lucinda Point and Cairns N(orth)Q(ueensland), London, Scotland, and “Sister Miss Nell Howard”.

_____________________________
Saturday 22nd November 1930
Voyage departs from Port Hobart. (Mawson 1932)
_____________________________
"First Iceberg sighted on the trip 900’ South of Hobart, Tasmania" (Sunday 30th November 1930)
30th November 1930
[IMAGE 001] “First Iceberg sighted on the trip 900’ South of Hobart, Tasmania”
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]

30th November 1930 – 53 degrees 04 minutes S. 154 degrees 51 minutes E.
During the night the wind backed to S.W. and steadily increased in force. The change in direction was very acceptable as it brought clearer weather without rain. The first icebergs were seen at 1930 in 53 degrees 29 minutes S. 156 degrees 6 minutes E. Five or six small bergs comprised the group, strung out in an east-west line, the most westerly berg estimated at 80′ high – the very remainder very small or awash.
– From: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] p.100

_____________________________

Monday 1st December 1930 – Thursday 4th December 1930
Arrived at Macquarie Island and landing 2nd December 1930.

Douglas Mawson landing on Macquarie Island (0800 Tuesday 2 December 1930)

Tuesday 2nd December 1930
[IMAGE 002] “Sir D. Mawson and party landing Maquarie Island en route to the Antarctic”
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]

Tuesday 2 December 1930
“At 0800 Sir Douglas Mawson and party landed on the beach in Buckles Bay facing the sealers’ huts for a stay of two days, during which time much valuable scientific information concerning the island and its fauna was obtained. Work in this respect was considerably hampered by bad weather. A strong S.W. wind blew incessantly and was accompanied by rain and snow squalls and a thick fog which shrouded the higher levels.”
-From: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] p.100

Penguins on Macquarie Island (Tuesday 2 December 1930)
Tuesday 2nd December 1930
[IMAGE 003] “Penguins on Macquarie Island. This Island is a good breeding ground for animals and bird life as it is situated outside The Antarctic”
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]
Tuesday 2 December 1930
“Bird life on Macquarie Is. is dominated by the penguin of which there are four distinct spcies; Royals, Kings, Rock-hoppers, and Gentoos; the two former are peculiar to the island. All show a marked increase in their numbers since depredations made by the sealers ceased.”
– From: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] p.100-101.
For a clip from Siege of the South, filmed during this Expedition click here
“W.F. Porteus with two young penguins Macquarie Island” (Tuesday 2 December 1930)
Tuesday 2nd December 1930
[IMAGE004] “W.F. Porteus with two young penguins Macquarie Island”
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]
Seals on the beach Macquarie Island (Tuesday 2 December 1930)
Tuesday 2nd December 1930
[IMAGE 005] “Seals on the beach Macquarie Island”
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]
Tuesday 2 December 1930
“With regard to the sea-elephants, which were found in vast numbers on the stony beaches and lower levels, most of the beasts were young calves and old bulls.”
– From: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] p.100
“Dead Sea Elephant and Skua Gulls Macquarie Island” (Dr Ingram and Harold Fletcher, biologist) Macquarie Island (Tuesday 2nd December 1930)
Tuesday 2nd December 1930

[IMAGE 006] “Dead Sea Elephant and Skua Gulls Macquarie Island” (Dr Ingram and Harold Fletcher, biologist)
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]

Tuesday 2 December 1930
“With regard to the sea-elephants, which were found in vast numbers on the stony beaches and lower levels, most of the beasts were young calves and old bulls.”

“Bird life on Macquarie Is. is dominated by the penguin of which there are four distinct species; Royals, Kings, Rock-hoppers, and Gentoos; the two former are peculiar to the island. All show a marked increase in their numbers since depredations made by the sealers ceased. Flying birds consisted mainly of the carrion eaters; Skua gulls, Dominican gulls and black and white petrels. A fine rookery of Cormorants is situated among the rocks close to the boat harbour in Hasselborough Bay. The Weka introduced from New Zealand forty years ago is now plentiful and is a valuable source of fresh meat for ships visiting the place. Fresh water may be obtained from a tank at the expedition hut and from any of the creeks on the hillside above the range of sea-elephants and penguins.”
– From: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] p.100-101

From Mawson’s missing diary (p102)
” Dr. Ingram and Fletcher with net and gun were to visit the lakes on the summit of the island in order to secure life from fresh water.”

5th December 1930
Depart Macquarie Island

_____________________________

10th December 1930
Loose pack ice was met in 62 degrees (Mawson, 1932)

The Discovery sights the Sir James Clark Ross (Monday 8 a.m. 15th December 1930)

15 December 1930

The Discovery sights the Sir James Clark Ross (Monday 8 a.m. 15th December 1930)

Sir James Clark Ross was sighted by the Discovery and soon moored to obtain coal.

“Sir J. Clarke Ross 22,000 tons Factory Whaling ship Antarctic O 65°Lat. South.”
[Annotation on reverse side of photograph]

Monday 15th December 1930
“Arrived at Clark Ross about 8 a.m. – soon tied up to her then coaling commenced. They had the coal in bow down below – hauled it up by wire net and winch swung onto our vessel. We tied up with a whale between, also several strips of blubber hung up as fenders. As quiet day, little breeze, and only very small swell, all went well.”
– From: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] p.108

Tabular ice berg, Antarctica (20th December 1930?)Ice berg sighted from the Discovery [20th December 1930?]Ice berg sighted from the Discovery [December 1930?]Ice berg observed from the Discovery [20 December 1930?]Ice crystals on rigging of the Discovery, Antarctica (December 1930)

20th December 1930?
Pleasant day, free of pack ice, large number of bergs seen, much worn and usually of striking appearance, sharp pinnacles of ice.. (Mawson, 1932)

[IMAGE 008] “End of a tabular ice-berg. These Bergs rarely exceed 200 feet in height but extend sometimes to a length of 4 or 5 miles.”
[IMAGE 009] “1,500 feet of ice and length Approx. 5 miles”
[IMAGE 010] No caption
[IMAGE 011]  No caption
[IMAGE 012] “Rigging showing signs of ice crystals Dec. 1930”

Information: The Winning of Australian Antarctica; Mawson’s B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. voyages, 1929-31, based on the Mawson papers. By A. Grenfell Price. Published for the Mawson Institute for Antarctic Research, University of Adelaide. [Sydney] Angus and Robertson [1962] see pages 110-114 for ship’s log concerning events during December 1930.
Crew member W. F. Howard on board R.R.S “Discovery” 28th December 1930
28th December 1930?
[IMAGE 013] “Self taken on board R.R.S “Discovery” at Adeli (sic) Land Dec 28th 1931.”
Factory ship “Kosmos” 29th December 1930‘Discovery’ berthed alongside whaler ‘Kosmos’ 1630 29th December 1930.Cutting up whales on the S.S. ‘Kosmos' 29th December 1930Ice berg after blizzard, Antarctica [4th January 1931?]

29th December 1930
[IMAGE 014] “Factory ship “Kosmos” 22,000 tons Whale chaser No.3 can be seen alongside. Each factory ship has a fleet of these small chasers which are powerfull (sic) craft of 18 knots.”
[IMAGE 015] “ ‘Discovery’ berthed alongside whaler ‘Kosmos’ bunkering coal”
[IMAGE 016] “Cutting up whales on the S.S. ‘Kosmos’”
[IMAGE 017] “Passing an ice berg in a heavy swell after a three day blizzard.”

 

 

Claiming of Adelie Land for the British Monday 1200 5th January 1931Adelie Land, Antarctica [5th - 6th January 1931?]Adelie Land Penguins [Tuesday 6th January]Adelie Land Penguins [Tuesday 6th January]
5th January 1931
King George V Land and Terre Adelie
[IMAGE 018] “The claiming of Adeli (sic) Land for the British 1931”
[IMAGE 019] “Adeli (sic) Land 2 Members of the Mawson Expedition Passed out on the way back from the South Magnetic Pole Feb 1913”
[IMAGE 020] “Penguins on Adeli (sic) Land Left. 2nd officer Colbeck & one of the crew.”
[IMAGE 021] “Adeli (sic) Land Penguins”
Captain Hurley, Antarctica [15th-16th January 1931?]Brush ice (sic) AntarcticaBrush ice, Antarctica

13th January 1931
[IMAGE 022] “Cpt. Hurley official photographer taking a scene for the screen version “Siege of the South. (sic) “
[IMAGE 023] “Brush Ice”
[IMAGE 024] “Brush ice – small pieces of various weights from 7 or 8 lbs to 3 or 4 tons.”

 

 

William F. Howard, "Self", Crew Member, BANZARE February 1931

February 1931
[IMAGE 025] “Self Galley skylight Feb. 1931.”

 

 

 

Pack ice, Antarctica [8 February 1931?]Pack ice, Antarctica [1 February 1931?]Pack ice, Queen Mary Land Antarctica [1st February 1931]

1st February 1931?

[IMAGE 026] “Our first view of the pack ice”
[IMAGE 027] “Pack ice edge encountered at sea. This pack ice in sections sometimes measuring 10 sq mils drifts with the wind tides or influence of the sea.”
[IMAGE 028] “Navigating through the pack ice Queen Mary Land.”

 

 

 

S.S. Falk and Durban 6 February 1931S.S. Falk and Durban 6 February 1931

6th February 1931
[IMAGE 029] “S.S. Falk and Durban 2 Whalers from South Africa.”
[IMAGE 030] “S.S. Falk and Durban 2 Whales are tethered ready for picking up.”

9th February 1931
Princess Elizabeth Land sighted from plane (Mawson 1932)

Main mast, AntarcticaPancake ice, AntarcticaPancake ice, AntarcticaPancake ice, AntarcticaPack ice as seen through the fore rigging

11th February 1931?
[IMAGE 031] “Changing look-outs 10pm Look-out is kept 175 feet aloft on the main mast.”
[IMAGE 032] “Pancake ice – flat surface and depth of ice rarely exceeds 3 feet under water.”
[IMAGE 033] Pancake Ice No Caption
[IMAGE 034] Pancake ice No caption
[IMAGE 035] “Pack ice as seen through the fore rigging.”

 

Princess Elizabeth Land, AntarcticaPrincess Elizabeth Land, Antarctica [9th February 1931?]
[IMAGE 036] “Floes of pancake ice off Princess Elizabeth Land”
[IMAGE 037] “Bad weather approaching off Princess Elizabeth Land.”

 

 

Ice berg drifting north, Antarctica

[IMAGE 038] “Ice Berg drifting north showing effect of wind and weather on its surface. This berg before breaking away from the Ant Circle was square or oblong in shape and owes its design to the wearing of the wind and waves on its surface.”

Stuck in the pack ice, Antarctica [Wednesday 4th February 1931?]Stuck in the pack ice, AntarcticaStuck in the pack ice, AntarcticaPenguins

Sometime between 11th – 18th February 1931? (Annotated as March 1931?)

[IMAGE 039] “Stuck in the pack ice.”
[IMAGE 040] “Stuck in the pack ice for a period of 3 weeks March 1931. A break of warm weather cleared us”
[IMAGE 041] “Obtaining fresh water while stuck in the pack ice during our trip. Surface ice or really snow is scooped up placed in the tanks above the engine room & melted down ice floes & pack ice are usually salt and only the recent falls on top of snow can be used.”
[IMAGE 042] “Visitors during our stay in the pack ice. Penguins on the ice pack.”

 

 

 

Heavy pack ice, AntarcticaHeavy pack iceIce Berg breaking upIce berg and pack icePack ice, Antarctica

12th February 1931?
[IMAGE 043] “Heavy Pack-ice encountered along the coast-line. This is rugged with many sharp projections and a great danger when near the ship in bad weather. Our usual speed through this ice was approx 1 to 2 mls per hour.”
[IMAGE 044] “Heavy Pack ice.”
[IMAGE 045] “Ice Berg breaking up”
[IMAGE 046] “Ice Berg & pack ice”
[IMAGE 047] Pack ice No caption

 

Ice berg, Antarctica
[IMAGE 048] “Type of ice-berg found around Lat 67° South. On an average these Bergs show 1/6th above water.”

 

 

Ice berg, AntarcticaIce bergs among the pack ice
[IMAGE 049] “End of an ice berg Note resemblance to human face.”
[IMAGE 050] “Ice Bergs among the pack ice.”

 

 

Coast of Mac-Robertson Land, Antarctica 13th February 1931Mac-Robertson Land, Murray Monolith Antarctica 13th February 1931
13th February 1931
[IMAGE 051] “Section of the coast line McRobertson land, named as a tribute to one of our backers.”
[IMAGE 052] “Another section of McRobertson Land No vegetation or soil Land formation Rock & Ice.”
Princess Elizabeth Land, Antarctica

28th February 1931
[IMAGE 053] “Coastline of Princess Elizabeth Land Survey & Charter by “Discovery” Feb 28th 1931.”

Gionni Di Gravio
Updated January 2012

22 thoughts on “2nd B.A.N.Z.A.R.E. Voyage to Antarctica

  1. In 1951 Howard Lt W E RANR was living at the Railway Club, Tamworth, NSW – listed in the Antarctic Club (British) of 1929 – List of Members – Booklet – the Australian Section commenced in 1940.
    In the 1949 Booklet he is listed in the British Section and living at 22 Wakefield Street, Kent Town, South Australia.
    This Mr Howard was a member of the Discovery Expedition of 1930-31 (2nd Voyage or Expedition) also known as the ‘Discovery Investigations’ or BANZARE . My father Eric Douglas was a member of the Club from 1940 till his death in 1970 – he was one of the two RAAF pilots with the Discovery Expeditions of 1929-30 & 1930-31. I made contact with the University of Newcastle some time ago

    • William E Howard was an Able Seaman and he was awarded the Polar Medal in 1934 – see National Library of Australia – Newspapers online or Trove – Sally Douglas

    • Trying desperately to find the name of a crew member on the 1929 expedition. My mother gave me an album of photos taken on this expedition, but the person only signed it W.J.G. I have no idea of the relationship of the photographer to my mother or her family and would love to know who this person was. I presume from your post on this site that you may have some access to more information on the expedition

    • Hello Phil,
      sorry it has taken me so long to reply.
      I have an album of photos, given to my mother, we think taken by the Chief Engineer, W.J. Griggs.
      He has dated it 1929/1930.
      Jenny Weimar

      • H i – 1929/30 was at the time of the first BANZ or BANZARE Voyage. Much of Frank Hurley’s original material on BANZ is with the National Library of Australia (first hand info from the Hurley family). But there are other collection places such as – the Scott Polar Institute at Cambridge University, the Discovery Point Museum at Dundee, Scotland – where the ‘Discovery’ ship is located, the Mawson Wing at the Adelaide Museum, the South Australian Library, the Australian Antarctic Division at Kingston, Tasmania; the Melbourne Museum (where I have donated a number of large Hurley prints and glass plates and slides, and a painting of the Discovery by a crew member – with only a few online to date), the National Archives of Australia, the National Film and Sound Archives and the National Portrait Gallery – the last three are in Canberra. In some cases there are multiple copies of images. Plus much of Frank Hurley’s AAE photographic material is with the Mitchell Library in Sydney.

      • Wilfred James Griggs was part of the Discovery’s Company in 1929-1931. He was the Chief Engineer on both Voyages of the BANZARE Antarctic Expedition. Griggs had previously been with the P & O Steam Navigation Company. Captain John King Davis had chosen the Ship’s Company for the expedition and he was particularly keen to have experienced men from the Merchant Navy. In addition to images elsewhere there are images at the Museum of Victoria which include Griggs. (Eric Douglas Collection). Griggs is also depicted in images at the Dundee Heritage Trust, online (Discovery Point, Dundee).

  2. Hi – I am an ex student from Williamstown High School Victoria. it is the school’s centenary Oct 2014 – Sept 2015. The ex- students committee released a CD containing The School magazine, called ‘High Tide’ in early 2000’s. In the 1930 High Tide it mentions Bill Howard – an ex student on the Antarctica expedition. Hope this helps

    • BANZARE – The Ship’s Crew
      Frank C Dungey – Chief Steward 1929-1930
      Josiah John Pill – Chief Steward 1930-1931
      F Sones – Cook 1929-1930
      John E Reed – Cook 1930-1931
      George James Rhodes – Assistant Cook 1930-1931
      Allan J Bartlett – Cook’s Mate 1929-1930 and Second Steward 1930-1931
      Clarence H V Sellwood – Assistant Steward 1929-1930
      Harry V Gage – Assistant Steward 1929-1930
      Ernest Bond – Assistant Steward 1930-1931
      Stanley R Smith – Fireman 1929-1930
      James T Kyle – Fireman 1929-1930
      Richard W Hampson – Fireman 1929-1930
      Frank Best – Fireman 1930-1931
      Murde Campbell Morrison – Fireman 1930-1931
      William Edward Crosby – Fireman 1930-1931
      John J Miller – Sailmaker 1929-1931
      C Degerteldt – Carpenter 1929-1930
      Joseph Williams – Carpenter 1930-1931
      W H Letten – Donkeyman (Auxillary Engineer) 1929-1931
      W Simpson – Boatswain 1929-1930
      James H Martin – Able Seaman 1929-1930 and Boatswain 1930-1931
      Kenneth McLennan – Able Seaman 1929-1930
      Raymond C Tomlinson – Able Seaman 1929-1930
      F Leonard Marsland – Able Seaman 1929-1930
      John A Park – Able Seaman 1929-1930
      Lauri Parviainen – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      A Hendrickson – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      David Peacock – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      William F Porteous – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      Norman C Matear – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      Fred G Ward – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      William F Howard – Able Seaman 1930-1931
      George Ayres – Able Seaman 1929-1931
      John Matheson – Able Seaman 1929-1931

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    • Hi Sally, Thanks for all your comments. We are not sure now whether he was a “William E” or a “William F”. We can’t aways trust the newspapers. I think we got the “William F” from the “The Winning of Australian Antarctica” (1962), I will have to check when I get the chance. Regards, Gionni

  5. Thanks Gionni – I think blurry newspapers images were the problem – it is hard to distinguish E or F. However the London Gazette, the British Antarctic Club members lists of 1949 and 1951 and the Australian Antarctic Data Centre at SCAR all list him as E for his second name. It is good to know that Howard Hills on the Beaver Glacier in Enderby Land are named for him.

    • I could only see A Howard in the Index of The Winning of Australian Antarctica. By the way Grenfell Price talked to my father Eric Douglas for this book, which I think is still the best basic book on BANZARE. I remember us waiting with anticipation for it to be published. We had two copies but a few years ago I sent one copy with my father’s other books on the Antarctic to the Antarctic Division’s Library at Kingston, Tasmania. One of the books was a hard copy edition of Sir Douglas Mawson’s Home of the Blizzard.

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