Troy

Heinrich Schliemann

Australian papers report on the discoveries of Heinrich Schliemann

The discoveries of Heinrich Schliemann, excavator of Troy and Mycenae, were enthusiastically reported in various Australian newspapers in 1877. As the following excerpt shows, the reports found a readership fascinated by the accounts of Schliemann’s dispatches:

Schliemann’s archaeological work was of interest to the non-scientific world as well. He kept the public informed of his discoveries through his books and through his dispatches to the London Times and Daily Telegraph, as well as a number of other newspapers, so that, as A. T. White wrote, “every person of culture and education lived through the drama of discovering Troy” (Lost Worlds, p. 27). His readers were excited by the romance of his undertaking and rejoiced in Schliemann’s incredible good luck in finding exactly what he had set out to find-the physical evidence of Homer’s Troy, and a buried hoard of golden treasure. Dictionary of Scientific Biography

THE ENTRANCE TO THE TOMB OF AGAMEMNON. See page 8.The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 – 1912) Saturday 21 April 1877.

Tomb of Agamemnon The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912) Saturday 21 April 1877

Gates of the Lions in the Citadel Mycene The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1871 - 1912) Saturday 21 April 1877

Mr Schliemann’s Discoveries at Mycene: Mask, etc, from Agamemnon’s Tomb. Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 – 1907), 19 May 1877.

The Newcastle University College Revues 1958-1965

Colin Anderson

Colin Anderson (Photograph courtesy of Robert Eather)

The late Dr Colin Robert Anderson, pictured above in his younger student days, passed away in 2014.  He was the director and prime mover of the early Newcastle University College Revues. The Newcastle University College, established in 1951, was the precursor of the University of Newcastle.

Thanks to the efforts of Robert Eather, Ken Longworth, Moira Gordon, Marilla North and others, we have been able to gather a number of the original recordings and related programmes and reviews of these theatrical performances. It has taken eight years to get to this point, since Ken Longworth first contacted us in 2008 about having this material digitised.

Thanks to Moira Gordon, (wife of the late Professor Barry Gordon, a producer for the first production) who tracked down the first ever University College Revue booklet for “Abandon Hope” we now know the original intention of the creators.

Editorial

“THIS IS the first University Revue that has been presented by Newcastle University College. Since its inception in 1951, the College, through the determined efforts of its student body, has introduced and developed those activities which so soon became a traditional part of University Life.

Notable amongst these are the student newspaper, “Opus”, which was first published in 1954, the annual day of “celebration”, Autonomy Day, July 1st, on which day students hit town, generally with a procession – so far we’ve attacked the Transport Department (1956) and the rock’n’roll craze (1957). These celebrations culminate in the Cabaret on the same evening.

Now Revue is joining this list of “traditions”. The aim of a University Revue is to rend(er) limb from limb politicians and professors, fascists and physicists, liberals and communists – in fact any one and anything that has of late been before the public eye and is worthy or unworthy enough to deserve satirizing. Revue also presents a number of items which rely solely on the talent of the actor or singer for their success. For thee acts, we need talent and have been lucky enough to find in our undergraduate ranks singers and dancers of note.

We of the Newcastle University College hope that you will enjoy our Revue and join in the spirit of the evening – one of gay banter and light-hearted fun. If you see someone vaguely resembling yourself on stage, be flattered; if you don’t feel relieved. If you don’t understand some of our more subtle jokes, don’t worry about it – it’ll hit you in about a fortnight’s time.”

However, there are gaps in the archives, and so we are very interested in hearing from past performers, collaborators, family and fans who may hold material relating to them.

Below you can see what we do have, if you see gaps that can be filled, or errors that need correction, or memories that can be added please let us know.

Cheers and please enjoy.

Gionni Di Gravio
University Archivist

 

1958
ABANDON HOPE

Abandon Hope Revue Programme (Courtesy of Moira Gordon)

Abandon Hope Revue Programme (Courtesy of Moira Gordon)

Abandon Hope! Original Disc (Courtesy of Ken Longworth)

Abandon Hope! Original Disc (Courtesy of Ken Longworth)

Programme: Abandon Hope Revue Programme (2.7MB PDF File) (Thankyou Moira Gordon)

Recording: Abandon Hope! – Newcastle University Revue 1958
Digital Copy Courtesy of Robert Eather  (93.8 MB Mp3 File)

Abandon Hope Programme (July, 1958) Courtesy of Moira Gordon

Abandon Hope Programme (July, 1958) Courtesy of Moira Gordon

Recording: Abandon Hope! Newcastle University Revue 1958
Digital Copy Courtesy of Ken Longworth

Track 01 Opening Abandon Hope! (2.9MB MP3 FILE)

Track 02 A Technical Barbarian (4.1MB MP3 FILE)

Track 03 Cinder Sue (11.6MB MP3 FILE)

Track 04 Newcastle Opera (9.1MB MP3 FILE)

Track 05 Charleston (2.3MB MP3 FILE)

Track 06 Mrs Dalloway Went Thataway (9.7MB MP3 FILE)

Track 07 Liberace  (6.1MB MP3 FILE)

Track 08 Dragnet  (7.1MB MP3 FILE)

Track 09 The Russian Ballet (3.3MB MP3 FILE)

1959
THE THIRD DEGREE

The Third Degree Revue Programme (Front Cover)

The Third Degree Revue Programme (Front Cover)

Programme: The Third Degree Revue Programme (4.7MB PDF File)

Recording: The Third Degree – NUC Revue (115.4 MB Mp3 File)
Digital Copy Courtesy of Robert Eather

Recording: The Third Degree
Digital Copy Courtesy of Ken Longworth

Track 01 Opening Chorus (1.9MB MP3 FILE)

Track 02 Don’t Take Your Cars To Town (3.7MB MP3 FILE)

Track 03 Sleeping Beauty (12.1 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 04 Thus Spake Our Bob (8MB MP3 FILE)

Track 05 On The Beach (9.7 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 06 Beatnik Blues (4.6 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 07 Doin’ What Comes Nacherley (3.1 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 08 Face The Mess (15.5 MB Mp3 FILE)

Track 09 Moments Best Forgotten (3.6 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 10 Cha Cha (3.5 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 11 Finale (26 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 12 My Fair Bookie (81.8 MB MP3 FILE)

Track 13 My Fair Bookie (73.6Mb MP3 FILE)

The-Third-Degree-4Reviews

Reviews - The Third Degree (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

Reviews – The Third Degree (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1960
BRAINWASH

Brainwash Newcastle University College Revue Programme

Brainwash Newcastle University College Revue Programme

Programme: Brianwash Revue Programme (1.5MB PDF File)
Recording: None Available

Revue Programme

Revue Programme

 Reviews

1960 Review - "Brainwash" At The Roxy (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1960 Review – “Brainwash” At The Roxy (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1961
FAUX PAS!

Faux Pas Revue Programme

Faux Pas Revue Programme

Programme: Faux Pas! Revue Programme (4.2MB PDF File)
Recording: Faux Pas! – NUC Revue (2 discs – 4 sides)

Faux Pas! Side 1 (54.1 MB MP3 File)

Faux Pas! Side 2 (51.5 MB MP3 File)

Faux Pas! Side 3 (52.6 MB MP3 File)

Faux Pas! Side 4 (50.4 MB MP3 File)

Faux Pas - A Revue

Faux Pas – A Revue

Reviews

1961 - Reviews - One Faux Pas After Another (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1961 – Reviews – One Faux Pas After Another (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962
8+2

8+2 Newcastle Univereity College Revue

8+2 Newcastle Univereity College Revue

Programme: 8+2 Revue Programme (2.9MB PDF File)
Recording: 8+2 – NUC Revue (1 discs – 2 sides)

8+2 Side 1 (101.7 MB MP3 File)

8+2 Side 2 (20.2 MB MP3 File)

8+2 Revue Programme

8+2 Revue Programme

Reviews

1962 - Reviews - "Eight Plus Two" Trimphs (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962 – Reviews – “Eight Plus Two” Trimphs (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962 - Reviews - "Eight Plus Two" (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962 – Reviews – “Eight Plus Two” (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962 - Reviews - "Eight Plus Two" (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962 – Reviews – “Eight Plus Two” (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962
In Time-Out

In Time-Out Newcastle University College Revue

In Time-Out Newcastle University College Revue

Programme: In Time-Out Revue Programme (3.3MB PDF File)
Recording: In Time-Out – NUC Revue (2 discs – 4 sides)

In Time-Out Sides 1 and 2 (124.4 MB MP3 File)

In Time-Out Sides 3 and 4 (58.7 MB MP3 File)

In Time-Out Revue Programme

In Time-Out Revue Programme

Reviews

1962 - Reviews - Plenty Of Fun in "In Time Out" (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1962 – Reviews – Plenty Of Fun in “In Time Out” (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1963?
Top Secret

Programme: None Available
Recording: None Available

Reviews

1963 - Reviews - "Top Secret" (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1963 – Reviews – “Top Secret” (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

Colin Anderson Farewell Clippings (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

Colin Anderson Farewell Clippings (Courtesy of Robert Eather)

1964?
Blue Pencil

Blue Pencil Newcastle University College Revue Programme

Blue Pencil Newcastle University College Revue Programme

Programme: Blue Pencil Revue Programme (3.7MB PDF File)
Recording: None Available

Blue Pencil Revue Programme

Blue Pencil Revue Programme

1964?
Right Now

Right NOW! Newcastle University College Revue

Right NOW! Newcastle University College Revue

Programme: Right NOW! Revue Programme (834KB PDF File)
Recording: None Available

Right NOW! Revue Programme

Right NOW! Revue Programme

 

1965?
Back To The Wall

Programme: None Available
Recording: None Available


Ken Longworth’s Reminiscences on the Newcastle College Revues

“I have recordings of songs and sketches from the first two Newcastle University College revues, Abandon Hope (1958) and The Third Degree (1959).

The Abandon Hope recording is a 12″ LP, while The Third Degree includes a 12″ LP and a 45rpm EP. The last has a long sketch called My Fair Bookie, which uses the music from My Fair Lady’s songs for a story about bookmakers. Margaret McDermott, later Margaret Bowman, was the female lead in that and some other sketches of the first two years.

The late Vic Rooney is among the other performers on the recordings, which were made by Vista Records, a Cooks Hill based recording studio.

I was the first person on stage in the first revue, Abandon Hope, playing the title character in a sketch called A Technical Barbarian. I was cast as a technical college student at Tighes Hill who reluctantly got caught up in the Uni revue and was pushed unwillingly on stage at the start of the show each night. I had to be literally pushed on stage every performance because it was a bit terrifying for a 17-year-old to be alone in front of a packed audience of 900 at the original Roxy Theatre in Hamilton who expected to be laughing from the first seconds after the overture. I suspect I was cast as the tech student because I was the youngest cast member of the revue, the only first-year student who went along to the auditions.

I wrote my first revue sketch for the second revue but unfortunately it wasn’t among those recorded. It had a lot of visual comedy, as well as funny lines (virtually all lifted from Tennessee Williams’s play Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, where they were all serious – it’s amazing what a difference a change of context can make!).

I was involved in the third revue in 1960 but, from memory, there was no recording. Everybody got a bit too ambitious in the third revue and some of the sketches, including two I wrote and directed, were yanked late in the piece because they weren’t working, with a melodrama replacing them in the middle act. I still think the sketches were among the best I wrote but I didn’t have control over the casting and some of the performers didn’t get the style that was needed.

I also wrote sketches for the fourth revue in 1961, the first staged in the then new auditorium/student dining room on the Tighes Hill campus, but I wasn’t too involved in the physical production and I’m unaware of a recording being made (although I do recall my voice being used in a recording done at the venue of a Dragnet send-up – it was a radio-style play and I think the voices were used offstage) . If there was one, I’d love a copy. My two sketches (neither listed in the program under my real name but under a nickname and a pseudonym) were among the show’s biggest hits and it would be great to hear them.”

Ken Longworth (March 2008)

Ken Longworth’s Notes on the Digitisation of Abandon Hope! and The Third Degree Vinyl Recordings

“The vinyl recordings made of the first two Newcastle University College revues (1958, 1959) are at last ready for me to hand over to the Newcastle University archives.

Adrian Gregg, a Newcastle theatre participant who is also involved in restoration of films and recordings, has cleaned the vinyl disks and transferred the recordings to compact disks.

There are three vinyl recordings: a 12-inch 33rpm LP of sketches and songs from the first revue, Abandon Hope, and a 12-inch LP and 45rpm EP featuring the second revue, The Third Degree.

The Abandon Hope recording was made after the revue, in a hall in Hamilton, when someone decided that a recording should be made of some of the production’s highlights. The Third Degree recordings are live, made during a performance, and, while they include the audience reaction, the sketches and songs vary in volume and clarity.

Adrian warned me that current styluses used for playback of vinyl recordings are different to those from the period when the recordings were made, so that playback with contemporary equipment might not be as good as with  use of older turntables and styluses.

He made me several CD copies of the recordings, so I’ll also give the archives one for each revue. (And he photographed the labels on the vinyl disks and used them for the CD case cover inlays). Adrian also made long-life masters on disks that are supposed to have a 300-year life. I’ll hang on to those, in case problems develop with the other disks.

There are track listings on the labels and he’s also put them in the back of the CD case inlays. However, the track listings for The Third Degree do not include the EP sketch, My Fair Bookie. As a result, there are two unlisted tracks on that CD.

Abandon Hope plays for about 37 minutes, while The Third Degree is about 62 minutes.

Unfortunately, there was no accompanying info with the recordings. I should have the revue programs in a box somewhere, so when I get the time I’ll look for them.

Playing the CDs, I recognised the voices of Vic Rooney and Maggie McDermott (now Bowman, after whom the Bowman building is named.) Boxhead O’Shea, who was also a first-grade rugby player and later a coach and who is still around Newcastle according to a Herald story earlier this year (I think his name was John but he was never called anything other than Boxhead), (ED.- “Boxhead” was Brian O’Shea, thanks Moira Gordon) plays Liberace in a sung sketch. I was also  horrified/fascinated to find myself in a sketch that I’d forgotten about.

There are references to lecturers – Cyril Renwick, or characters based on him, featured in both revues – and there is a sketch called Face the Mess, which was based on the TV interview show Meet the Press, which includes a breathy guest called Norma Sykes. I eventually remembered that Norma Sykes  was the real name of Sabrina, a chesty British celebrity.

A song in the 1958 revue, Don’t Take Your Cars To Town, has a reference to parking meters in Newcastle that suggests 1958 was the year they were introduced.

A lot of the people and references to events are, as you’d expect, of their time, so some sort of research could be needed into the recording contents to make them truly valuable archive records (no pun intended).

I can deliver the recordings and CDs when you are ready for them. It would be good if the ABC could be persuaded to do something on them, and if Margaret Bowman could be induced to talk to an ABC presenter
about the revues.”

Ken Longworth
November 2008

Barry Gordon’s Observations on the student ‘Revue’ in Newcastle
(From Barry Gordon’s “The Gordons of Merewether”, selected by Moira Gordon)

In late 1993, Professor Barry Gordon set about writing a family history, commencing with his graduation in 1956 and his move to Newcastle to join the staff of Newcastle University College.  At the time of his death, he had carried this project up to the early 1980s.  Barry scoured a wide range of sources to build up a chronology of events and happenings, using his skills built up working with historical material.  He commenced with mining his own old diaries and those kept by Moira, photographs, letters, newspaper clippings, calendar charts used to plan activities while of overseas trips, the memorabilia kept from these travels, expenditure records, taxation returns, school reports, trophies, magazines and papers which had been kept, publications, unpublished papers.  Then, as he faced the task of clearing out his room at the University of Newcastle at the beginning of 1994, and thereby sorting through papers and correspondence files built up over thirty-five years, this had meshed well with Barry’s project, and much material relating to his professional and university associations emanated from this. From this history of “The Gordons of Merewether”, Moira Gordon has selected Barry’s observations about the early occasions of student ‘Revue’ in Newcastle.

 

In Autumn [1958] Barry [Gordon] resumed as captain-coach of the reserve grade rugby side, and a group of students approached him with the idea of mounting a university revue. He agreed to co-direct the production together with one of the students, John Hartigan. In this undertaking his prior involvement with Sydney University Revue was an important factor. Scripts for sketches were contributed by two brilliant Sydney satirists, Philip Grahame (known as “Chester”) and John Cummings. Robert Hughes, who later became art critic for Time magazine and a high-profile author and presenter of TV series on art and culture, came to Newcastle to paint the back drops. Barry wrote scripts and song lyrics, co-compered the show, and appeared in some of the sketches. Moira volunteered her services backstage as call-girl. Intensive rehearsals for the revue began in May. (p.11)

The Revue “Abandon Hope” opened for a four-night season at the old and cavernous Roxy Theatre, Beaumont Street, Hamilton in early July. It was a cause celebre with full houses after opening night. Newcastle had not seen a production of its kind, in which fast-paced, topical satire of the “intimate revue” variety predominated. The cast and stage crew were drawn mainly from members of the rugby club and the university’s ladies hockey team. Their exuberant style was irresistible. Stand-out performers were Margaret McDermott (subsequently, Bowman), Brian O’Shea, Colin Anderson and Vic Rooney, all amateurs at the time. The last two went on to professional careers involving theatre and TV. (pp. 11-12).

The first university revue had been so successful, and the participants had enjoyed the experience so much, that a second was staged [in 1959]. Barry wrote scripts and lyrics, and directed some of the sketches. “The Third Degree” opened at the Roxy in late July. An even better production than its predecessor, it played to enthusiastic audiences and congratulatory reviews. The proceedings were recorded live and issued on L.P. for private circulation. (p.15).

The third University revue “Brainwash”, opened at the Roxy in July [1960]. Barry was not as heavily involved as in the past, but contributed lyrics and a sketch, “Gunn with the Bourbon on Beat Hunter Street” which mingled scenes and characters from two private-eye TV series with Newcastle personalities and events. At the end of the Winter, rugby coaching concluded with a premiership win, and Barry wrote a review of the first six years of the University Rugby Club for Opus, the College newspaper. (p.19)

He [Barry] wrote on a variety of subjects during the year [1962], including an article on jazz for the University arts magazine Nimrod, a piece on hire purchase for the Melbourne-based Catholic Worker, and with Moira, a paper on marriage for a conference of the Sydney Newman Society. Another paper was “Kingship, Priesthood and Prophecy in the Lord of the Rings”, a lengthy analysis of the J.R.R. Tolkien classic which was yet to become widely celebrated. There were also some long lyrics for the University revue. (p.24).

 VIDEOS

These interviews were recorded by Ken Longworth on the 4 April 2009 at a reunion held at the Central Coast of students of Newcastle University College.

 

Shifting perspectives

FAN DONGWAN exhibition

Fan Dongwang, Dragon, 2010, acrylic on canvas, 180 x 180cm

FAN DONGWANG
Shifting Perspectives: paintings 1995 – 2015


A twenty-year survey of Chinese born artist Fan Dongwang

Exhibition at the University Gallery
12 August – 5 September 2015

This survey exhibition explores the shifting borders of Asian and Australian cultures through a series of dynamic, large format paintings that use colour and motif to shift cultural perceptions in art. The works exhibit a refined attention to detail while exploring the global experience of shifting boundaries in this Asian century.

SPECIAL GALLERY EVENTS
Wednesday 12 August from 12pm

STUDENT HOUR ARTIST TALK with Fan Dongwang at 12pm
FLOOR TALK with Curator and Art Historian, Dr Rod Pattenden at 3pm
These are free events, all welcome

Please join the artist and Dr Rod Pattenden for the official launch at the University Gallery:
Wednesday 12 AUGUST at 5.30pm

This project has been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body, and by the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy, an initiative of the Australian State and Territory Governments.

Donation Honours Memory of Griffith Duncan

I Look Ahead - Towards A Better World (University of Newcastle and Newcastle Teachers' College, later Newcastle College of Advanced Education Mottos)

I Look Ahead – Towards A Better World (University of Newcastle and Newcastle Teachers’ College, later Newcastle College of Advanced Education Mottos)

A small ceremony held in the University’s Auchmuty Library to mark the donation of a book to Cultural Collections has conjured memories of the legacy of one of the Hunter Region’s educational giants.

Griffith Duncan

The book was a presentation copy of the Poems and Plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930) awarded as the Charles Oliver Prize to a 16 year-old Griffith Duncan, “for Magazine Articles”  by the Headmaster of Maitland High School (Mr Charles H. Chrismas) on the 16th December 1930.

The poems and plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930)

The poems and plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930)

The poems and plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930)

The poems and plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930)

Charles Oliver Prize plate within The poems and plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930)

Charles Oliver Prize plate within The poems and plays of Oliver Goldsmith (1930)

This young man would go on to become foundation Principal of the Newcastle Teachers’ College, later incorporated as the Newcastle College of Advanced Education and Hunter Institute of Higher Education before it amalgamated with the University of Newcastle 1989. The book was donated by Mrs Pat Wilson, who along with her daughter Amanda, and friends Emeritus Professor John Hamilton and wife Alison handed the book over to Special Collections Librarian Lyn Keily and Mark Sutherland Associate Librarian (Research and Information Services).

Mrs Pat Wilson (in red) with daughter Amanda, presenting the book to Lyn Keily and Mark Sutherland (centre). Photo: Gregg Heathcote

Mrs Pat Wilson (in red) with daughter Amanda, presenting the book to Lyn Keily and Mark Sutherland (centre). Photo: Gregg Heathcote

The book had been passed on to Mrs Wilson by Griffith Duncan’s aunt, Annie Robson, now deceased. Mrs Wilson discussed the possibility to donate the book to the University’s Collections with her friends Emeritus Professor John Hamilton and wife Alison, which was accepted.

(l-r) Emeritus Professor John Hamilton, Alison Hamilton, Pat Wilson with daughter Amanda, Lyn Keily, Gionni Di Gravio)

(l-r) Emeritus Professor John Hamilton, Alison Hamilton, Pat Wilson with daughter Amanda, Lyn Keily, Gionni Di Gravio) Photo: Gregg Heathcote

As part of the occassion, a display of Newcastle Teachers’ College photo albums, as well as a recording of Huldha Turner speaking about the College days was played over a slide show of images of the 1949 Pioneer Session. This helped bring back memories of Griffith Duncan and his ongoing legacy and leadership in education to the Hunter Region and beyond.

Griffith Duncan Presentation and Slide Show of 1949 Pioneer Session Photographs

Griffith Duncan Presentation and Slide Show of 1949 Pioneer Session Photographs. Photo: Gregg Heathcote

 

The lasting impression he left on his students and staff has shaped their lives and the lives of all that followed. Huldah Turner summed it up in her parting address to Dr Douglas Huxley on the 4th March 1992:

 

“When I left the college in early 1967, we were still dreaming of our “permanent campus” and wondering if it was, after all, an unattainable pipe dream. However, in spite of our primitive campus those who knew the Union Street Experience claimed that it had camaraderie and a warm fierce loyalty unique in similar institutions. It had to be experienced to be understood.

This spirit was initiated and engendered by its Foundation Principal, Grif Duncan, a man of massive intellect, wide ranging cultural interests and infinite compassion.

He put students and staff before self and all who worked with him came to know his stature; unfaltering integrity, dedication to his college and profound understanding.

He loved his college. He was fiercely proud of it and he fought all the way for his better world.

The college motto of course was his:

“AD MELIOREM MUNDUM”
Towards a Better World

 

We thank Mrs Pat Wilson and family, as well as Emeritus Professor John Hamilton and wife Alison, for enabling this donation to the University of Newcastle. It has provided a humble reminder of what we are all here to achieve. In these times when the University of Newcastle is seeking to find its distinctive path in a new and challenging global environment, we cannot think of a better and more simple goal for the University, combining its motto with that of  Griff Duncan’s Newcastle Teachers’ College, igniting the powerful Promethian myth that knowledge and education can break the bonds of an enslaved mind, and ignite an eternal flame of ongoing freedom and progress for the good:

“I Look Ahead Towards A Better World”

Gionni Di Gravio
University Archivist
12 August 2015

History Research Seminar Series Semester 2, 2015

History @ Newcastle

Research Seminar Series

ALL WELCOME!!

Seminars are held in Cultural Collections @ Auchmuty Library (ground floor, through AIC), from 10am, and are followed by morning tea at 11am.

Semester Two, 2015

Week 3
Friday 14 Aug.
Ken Thornton – UoN
“The ‘Poles and Wires’ do not care who owns them. Should we? The rise of centralised coordination of electricity generation and transmission in New South Wales 1888-2003.”
Week 5
Friday 28 Aug.
Julie McIntyre – UoN
“Australia’s Atlantic: Trans-imperial encounters, exchange and entanglement”
Week 7
Friday 11 Sept.
TBC
Week 9
Friday 9 Oct.
Chris Cuneen – Macquarie
“The ADB 50 Years On: updating Dangar, Dumaresq and co”
Week 11
Friday 23 Oct.
Jo May – UoN
“Headmistresses, Archives and Audit Selves: reflections on the first two female principals of Maitland Girls High School 1884-1887”
Week 13
Friday 6 Nov.
Michael Kilmister – UoN
‘Treading on Anzac’s Sacred Ground: Fight or Flight?’*

For more information contact matthew.lewis@newcastle.edu.au or visit the History @ Newcastle Facebook page.


*This paper is co-authored by Dr James Bennett and Dr Jennifer Debenham.

Free Oral History Workshop at Muswellbrook Library

A few members of our Cultural Collections team will be conducting an Oral History Workshop at Muswellbrook Library on the 26th August 2015 between 9:30 am and 1:30 pm.

Free Oral History Workshop at Muswellbrook

This free workshop is part of a project called Voices of the Hunter which is managed by the University of Newcastle, with support from the Coalfields Heritage Group and Coal & Allied. This project follows in the footsteps of Oral History Collector, Jack Delaney (pictured above), who produced a large number of recordings on cassette over a period of 20 years. This collection is held by the Coalfields Heritage Group, who loaned it to the University for digitisation. The collection is now being made freely available online.

The aim of the workshops is to reach out to anyone in the Coalfields community who would like to learn how to plan, organise and collect their own history whether it is family or community history. The presenters will give participants the confidence to assemble and preserve their collected stories. It is an opportunity to see the world through the eyes of others and appreciate how things came to be.

If you would like to participate in the workshop please make a booking at Muswellbrook Library or phone (02) 6543 1913 by August 12th. Places are limited.

C50-PART 2 -AUTONOMY & EARLY PARTNERS

4135203528_4bf7130b71_oIn 2015, the University of Newcastle celebrates 50 years.  The university has a rich history and the community has been the mainstay, instrumental in its many achievements and milestones.

Students at the UON were active in radical protests, and the Autonomy Day freedom marches, led by renowned Classics Professor Godfrey Tanner, became another important part of the path to autonomy. Students were active in campaigning for civil rights and environmental issues other issues in the 1960s such as opposition to the Vietnam War. Later Autonomy Day events saw students standing up for rights of Aboriginal people in Australia and their non- representation at universities.  Campaigns for equitable access to education for all had an enduring influence, seen through the University’s history of commitment to equity in education.

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Autonomy Day ” We Need An International House” – 19th July 1967. UON Library Cultural Collections. Photograph donated by Katherine MacNeill

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Autonomy Day ” We Need An International House” – 19th July 1967. Autonomy Day, UON Library Cultural Collections. Photograph donated by Katherine MacNeill.

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Autonomy Day, 19th July 1967. Photograph by Ross Smith, UON Library Cultural Collection .

WHO WAS GODFREY TANNER?
Godfrey Tanner (1927-2002) came to Newcastle in 1959 aged 32, initially appointed lecturer at the Newcastle University College he was Professor of Classics at UON, however even earlier than this had responded, along with Auchmuty, in realising the need for a traditional university for Newcastle. He introduced students to the traditions of student life, and taught them that the UON had a part to play in the life of Newcastle and Hunter community. Retiring in 1993, in 1994 the University awarded him an Honorary Degree, a Doctor of the University. In 1998 the Godfrey Tanner Scholarship Fund was established.
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Mrs. Lorna George and Professor Godfrey Tanner at a sporting event, the University of Newcastle, Australia

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Professor Godfrey Tanner, the University of Newcastle, Australia – 1990

12 April 1961 “Freedom march” from Tighes Hill to City Hall led by Godrey Tanner, demanding autonomy and against Baxters who didn’t want to divide the colleges, he supported multi-campus educational institutions.   Many believed that Newcastle University College should continue to operate as a college of the University of NSW, however others pushed for an independent university for Newcastle. On 1 January 1965, the Governor of NSW proclaimed the University of Newcastle Act, marking the University’s foundation as an independent institution & declaring autonomous from the University of NSW.

According to folk legend, our understanding is that autonomy for the University officially began on the 1st January 1965 with a symbolic ceremonial bonfire held at the site of the Great Hall and officiated by the legendary Professor Godfrey Tanner who poured wine libations on the ground to sanctify the land upon which the University rests. The bonfire signified the “the joy of attaining long sought destiny”.

Autonomy day is normally held in early July, and students interpreted it as celebrating the autonomy of the University of Newcastle, from the University of New South Wales.

The date coincided with autonomy of the University of Technology from the Public Service Board control on the 1st July 1954. The students called this day ‘autonomy day’, giving them a sense of the importance of autonomy and were resistive against those on the outside.

The University’s beautiful Grant of Arms is our very own Declaration of Independence. The University of Newcastle was constituted on the 1st January 1965 by a Proclamation of His Excellency the Governor of New South Wales and signed and sealed on the 23rd December 1964 under the provisions of the University of Newcastle Act of that year. This historic document, along with Autonomy Day celebrates the University’s emergence as an autonomous institution in 1965.

The original inspiration for the University’s seahorse design came from Fairbairn’s Book of Crests and was Professor Auchmuty’s favourite design. The coat of arms was based upon that of the Shortland family. Lieutenant John Shortland led the first Colonial Expedition to Newcastle in 1797, and the site upon which the University was built was called Shortland.

The motto adopted for the University ‘I LOOK AHEAD’ was approved by Council in August 1965 and was in keeping with the ambitions of a University and the appearance of the seahorse on the shield. Professor Brin Newton-John is credited with choosing the ‘I look Ahead’ motto and choosing the colours. More information here
More information about Autonomy Day is here.

WHO WAS PROFESSOR BRIN NEWTON-JOHN ?
Professor Brin Newton-John was born in Cardiff in 1914 and studied at Cambridge where he gained a double major in modern languages and history. After graduation he became a teacher and then worked as a RAF pilot during World War II where his knowledge of the German language was especially important and helped him in his top secret intelligence work decoding German communications.He emigrated to Australia in 1954 for a post as Master of Ormond College at the University of Melbourne. He relocated to Newcastle in 1959 eventually becoming Vice Chancellor of the newly established institution. He retired in 1974.
Professor Brin Newton-John, the University of Newcastle, Australia - c1990s

Professor Brin Newton-John, the University of Newcastle, Australia – c1990s

Early partners of the UON
University and industry have always worked together very closely. The university has encouraged research and discoveries into new and innovative products and solutions through collaboration with industry, business and government partners.
In 1965 the emergence of the UON opened up new cultural and intellectual opportunities for the city of Newcastle and the Hunter Region. Those who began to build the University had a clear vision. Local and regional businesses gave financial and in kind support for the development of the University, this demonstrated, that industries themselves saw a local university as an asset. Newcastle contained the nation’s largest concentration of heavy industry, Newcastle’s largest employers were BHP and it may have seemed to some a place that did not need a university. The majority of students at the new UON when it opened undertook degrees associated with heavy industry, such as science and engineering. Companies such as BHP were there from the beginning to support the University, a partnership that endured for decades.
In the late 1960s, Newcastle’s largest employers were BHP, Stewarts and Lloyds, Commonwealth Steel and the State Dockyard. Newcastle contained the nation’s largest concentration of heavy industry. The majority of students were apprentices or trainees in heavy industry, and these industries supported science and engineering offering financial and in kind support of the development of the University.

BHP invested in the latest technology and shared its resources with academics.  One example was an IBM1620 computer installed at the works in 1962 which was made available to staff of the Mathematics Department and later relocated to the University.  A commercial arm of the university.

Two gentlemen using IBM1620 data processing system, the University of Newcastle, Australia

Two gentlemen using IBM1620 data processing system, the University of Newcastle, Australia

For industries in the region UON has had a strong research focus from the beginning and the University’s early partners were associated with industry in the region, they included BHP and other heavy industry and the focus of research in the areas of Science and Engineering.  Industry invested in technology and shared resources with academics and the University has always been responsive to industry partners and its students.  A commercial arm of the university known as The University of Newcastle Research Associates Ltd (TUNRA) was set up in 1969 to manage research and consultancies conducted with private funding.  Financial and in kind support from industry of the development of the University demonstrated that the industries themselves saw a local university as an asset.  This close relationship persisted.  BHP invested in the latest technology and shared its resources with academics.

Photo 8

TUNRA display on Open Day, the University of Newcastle, Australia

TUNRA enabled research to be undertaken at the university and be delivered to provide services to business and industry in the region.   Through TUNRA the university provided equipment and knowledge to operate pollution measuring devices to help improve condition of people living in industrial areas. Today the UON’s technology transfer company is named Newcastle Innovation.

NBN 3-University of Newcastle Environment Measurement Unit” (EMU) being driven around their streets. Sophisticated “sniffing” Equipment has been installed in the vehicle, which will be used to obtain data on the quantities of some of the main pollutants in Newcastle’s atmosphere at a range of locations. The service has, in large part, been made possibly by the Newcastle Broadcasting and Television Corporation Limited, which operates a commercial television station, NBN Channel.” MOVABLE POLLUTION TESTING –Gazette April 1972

A Phillips’ technician completing installation of the SO2 monitor in a Kombi van at the University of Newcastle, Australia

A Phillips’ technician completing installation of the SO2 monitor in a Kombi van at the University of Newcastle, Australia

“FIRST THERMAL SCANNER IN AUSTRALIA – A Daedalus (or Thermal) Remote Sensing Scanner has been acquired by the Department of Physics to enable the Department to obtain “heat pictures” of stretch of terrain flown over by aircraft carrying the Scanner. It is the first equipment of this sort to be operated in Australia. Valued at approximately $80,000 the scanner and associated equipment employ infrastructure radiation to reveal interesting data on resources and other features.” Gazette February  1971

Initially the University was involved in fields such as engineering and chemistry, today the university has pushed into areas of energy and the environment, health and medical research as seen in partnerships with Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) in 1998 and Newcastle Institute for Energy and Resources (NIER) in 2010.

UON C50 – PART 1 – ASPIRATIONS FOR A UNIVERSITY 

Sources

Wright, D. (1992) Looking Back : A History of the University of Newcastle. The University of Newcastle: Callaghan.

Our Univer-city: Recasting the city of Newcastle as a knowledge hub. http://www.newcastle.edu.au/about-uon/our-university/celebrate-50-years/our-univer-city Adapted from Cushing, N., Quinn, K., and McMillen, I.C. “Recasting the City of Newcastle as a Univer-city: The Journey from ‘Olde’ Newcastle-upon-Tyne to the New Silk Road”. In Teo, A.S.C. (Ed.). (2014). Univer-Cities volume II. Manuscript in preparation.

University Archives held at UON Auchmuty Library Cultural Collections.

UON Flicker https://www.flickr.com/photos/uon

Information compiled by Dr Ann Hardy for the C50 Project on behalf of UON Library Cultural Collections June 2015.